wild Up, Lisa Bielawa and Colburn Conservatory – Recap of Santa Ana Sites #4

February 25, 2014

Grand Central Art Center is beginning to use the tagline “Art unRestricted” to describe our programming.  A perfect example of GCAC’s philosophy took place this past Saturday evening, as we presented the fourth in our ongoing Santa Ana Sites series, co-founded with our community collaborator and artistic director Allen Moon.

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Santa Ana Sites #4: wild Up in The Santora was our collaboration with Chris Rountree, founder and creative director of Los Angeles based new music ensemble wild Up; Lisa Bielawa, New York based composer, vocalist and GCAC Artist in Residence; and musicians of the Colburn Conservatory of Music.

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The evening began with a reception at GCAC, where we gathered the 225+ in attendance and provided each with a program and wristband of a certain color, which marked groups of 60.   At 7:30, the guests were officially welcomed by GCAC Director/Chief Curator John D. Spiak and given a brief overview of how the evening would play out.  They were told they would be escorted across the plaza to the Santora Building in groups of 60, where the official program would begin.

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Upon arrival at the Santora, guests were greeted in the atrium by Genesis Again, a vocal work by Lisa Bielawa with solo accompaniment on violin by Andrew Tholl.

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As the short piece concluded, the audience transitioned to the second floor of the building where the full wild Up music ensemble was performing James Tenney’s Swell throughout the open area.  This transition continued to occur until all 225+ audience members were gathered together on the second floor, experiencing the performance of Swell together.

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As the work concluded, Allen Moon introduced Chris Rountree, who provided insight into the printed program and spaces of the building.   The program laid out nine locations throughout the three stories of the Santora Building – atrium, third floor, stairway, se corner, OC Creatives, Tween’s Studio, NW corner, steet level gallery, basement – each providing a micro venue which had been separately programed for the evening.  It was a structure that provided the opportunity for each audience member to self-select his or her experience.

The choices were as follows:
Chance Encounter – Lisa Bielawa
Retracing – Eliot Carter Solo for Bassoon
Quintet – Andrew Tholl
The Cohen Variations – Daniel Felsenfeld
Let Down – Radiohead
Synopsis #5 – Lisa Bielawa solo for trumpet
Cabaret and Bach – for bass and voice
Ongoing percussion installation – Corey Fogel
The Twin Suite – Samuel Vriezen
Fratres – Arvo Part
Grisey for clarinet
Spirit Worker – ongoing installation by Chris Kallmyer
Synopsis #9 – Lisa Bielawa solo for Viola
Works by Luciano Berio and John Cage for soprano and voice
Punk Rock Set 1: Deerhoof and Dog Face Hermans
Trombone Sequenza – Luciano Berio
Synopsis #9 – Lisa Bielawa solo for English Horn
Synopsis #3 – Lisa Bielawa solo for Flute
Three Meditations on California Girls – Andrew Tholl
Above Chiangmai – Harold Budd
Love in Outerspace – Sun Ra
Narayana’s Cow – Tom Johnson
Knee Play 2 – Philip Glass

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The evening concluded with everyone reuniting in the street level gallery space to experience the last works of the evening together:
From the Cello Suites – J.S. Bach – Archie Carey
Punk Rock Set 2: FEAR, The Misfits, Deerhoof

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It was truly a remarkable evening, as wild Up and Lisa Bielawa allowed us to continue to expand our notions of the unRestricted!

Thank you to all the talented performers who made the evening possible:
Christopher Rountree (Artistic Director/Conductor/Voice), Lisa Bielawa (voice), Andrew Tholl (violin), Linnea Powell (viola), Claire Chenette (oboe/English horn), Dana Jackson (bassoon), Chris Kallmyer (guitars/trumpet), Andrew McIntosh (violin/viola), Ruiging Tang (viola), Brian Walsh (clarinets/saxophones), Allen Fogle (horn), Corey Fogel (drums), Justine Aronson (soprano), Melinda Rice (violin/viola), Derek Stein (cello), Eleanor Weigert(clarinets), Jonah Levy (trumpet), Matt Cook (percussion), Richard Valitutto (piano/accordion/melodica), Maggie Hasspacher (bass/voice), Erin McKibben (flute/piccolo), Archie Carey (bassoon), Matt Barbier (trombone), and Jodie Landau (percussion/voice).

Santa Ana Sites #4 was made possible through the generous support of Santora Group LLC, with in-kind support provided by Ashley Eckenweiler, The ACE Agency, Tweena Tran and Memphis Cafe.  We also recognize the wonderful contributions of time and energy the Grand Central Art Center team provide on a daily bases to ensure successful outcomes, so please join us in thanking them next time you visit.

Thank you as well to Kurt Mortensen and Steve Fisch for providing images and video from the evening!

Here are a few video links from the evening:

on YouTube:

on KCRW:
http://blogs.kcrw.com/whichwayla/2014/03/all-the-worlds-a-stage

on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10202872813802754&set=vb.1274343186&type=2&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10202872901164938&set=vb.1274343186&type=2&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10202873016687826&set=vb.1274343186&type=2&theater

To keep informed of future programs, as well as to see images and programming of past events, visit the Santa Ana Sites Facebook page at:
https://www.facebook.com/santaanasites

Success of programming is made possible through the generous financial support of individuals like you.  Contribute to GCAC’s continued success by make a donation online today!
https://www.fullerton.edu/SupportGCAC

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March 1st from 6-10pm – Opening Receptions, Public Program and Cookies @ GCAC!

February 19, 2014

Join us to kick-off the month with two new exhibitions, a public program and other activities celebrating our First Saturday Art Walk scheduled for March 1st – Public Program at 6pm, Opening Receptions from 7-10pm, Girl Scout Cookie Sales from 7-9pm.

Here is what we have planned to engage you…

PUBLIC PROGRAM – 6PM

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Feminism Today: Art and Life
panel discussion
March 1,  6PM
Grand Central Art Center A.I.R. Basement Studio

On March 1st, Life of An Artist (Ingrid Reeve, Barbara Milliorn and Evan Senn) will continue their dialogue with the public on what it means to be a feminist, a working female art professional, and more.

Through a panel discussion with some of Southern California’s prominent and influential female artists, art professionals, critics and professors, the Feminism Today: Art and Life panel presentation and conversation will focus on feminist art practices in both contemporary art and life. The women involved will open up to the public, and to Life of an Artist: a reality TV web series, in a discussion of how everyday life and art-making intersect.  Topics will include sexism, racism and/or the trials, tribulations or benefits of being a women, and feminists, as female art professionals have experienced in their respective artistic careers and personal lives.

Confirmed panelists include:

Carrie Yury: Carrie Yury is Head of Research and Insights at BeyondCurious, Inc., and she writes for the Huffington Post regularly. Yury is also a nationally-exhibited fine artist, mother, wife and feminist. She is based in Orange County, and is represented by the Sam Lee Gallery.

Micol Hebron: Micol Hebron is an interdisciplinary artist and is an Assistant Professor at Chapman University. She is the founder of the LA Art Girls, the (former) co-founder of the artist collective The Elizabeths, and a contributing editor at X-TRA Magazine. She lives and works in Los Angeles, where she is represented by Jancar Gallery. Her latest project is featured on the cover of Artillery Magazine this month.

Arzu Arda Kosar: Arzu Arda Kosar is an international artist now residing in Los Angeles. She is the founder of Yarn Bombing Los Angeles, a member of the MapConception. She is the co-founder of TransIstanbul Collective that worked with inner city youth in Istanbul, Turkey and co-founder of International Survey of Alternative Artscene that examined contemporary art practices outside of the museum-gallery system in different parts of the world.

Joanna Roche: Dr. Joanna Roche, published poet and Professor of Art History, is a specialist in contemporary art. She specializes in Modern Art, Theory and Practice in New Media, Methods and Historiography. Her publications include articles and reviews on Joseph Cornell, Goat Island, Carolee Schneemann, Cindy Sherman, Pipilotti Rist, Tom Nechtal, Christian Hill, Joe Forkan and Nobuhito Nishigawara. Her scholarship examines the interworkings of memory and making in contemporary art.

Carrie Paterson: Carrie Paterson is an artist, writer and professor whose work crosses interdisciplinary boundaries between the arts and sciences. Paterson has taught various courses at many universities in Southern California since 2001 in sculpture, expository writing, visual culture, and the narrative structures in contemporary culture. Paterson has contributed essays, reviews and critical articles to a variety of publications including Sculpture, Flash Art, X-TRA, Artillery and Artweek, and currently she is Reviews Editor for Artillery Magazine.


OPENING RECEPTIONS – 7 to 10PM

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Heather Bowling and Amanda Patenaude: You Are What You Concede
Curated by Kimberly McKinnis, CSUF MA in Exhibition and Design
OPENING RECEPTION – MARCH 1 from 7-10pm
March 1 through April 13, 2014

East Coast artist Amanda Pantenaude will team up with West Coast artist Heather Bowling, for a first time collaboration, creating a site-specific installation made from recycled materials collected within the Santa Ana community.  The artists are interested in social awareness and have created previous participatory projects in the hope to educate the public about current and pressing global issues.

The collection of materials will be organized through a series of community events, collaborating with local individuals and organizations. Hands-on workshops, panels and programs are being developed for the course of the exhibition.

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Julia Haft-Candell: Fast and Slow
Curated by Yevgeniya Mikhailik, GCAC Curatorial Associate
OPENING RECEPTION – MARCH 1 from 7-10pm
March 1 through May 11, 2014

Julia Haft-Candell‘s sculptures are physical records of their making, and a reflection of their own history. Using small components to build larger forms, the artist continually invents, reassesses and makes endless decisions about how the work takes shape. Ultimately the goal is to form a composition that most effectively speaks to the ambiguity of perception and the complexity of being.

Using forms inspired by nature and the body, as well as ideas derived from quick doodles and sketches, she focuses on the space in between two contrasting concepts as a metaphor for my experience as a human being. In Haft-Candell’s words “I express contradictions. I seek the intersection of the conscious and subconscious, construction and destruction, fast and slow, serious and funny, hard and soft.”


GIRL SCOUT COOKIES

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Grand Central Art Center welcomes Santa Ana Girl Scout Troop #2363, who will be selling cookies for $4/box, plus collecting donations for the Southwest Community Center (homeless shelter) throughout the evening.


CONTINUING EXHIBITION

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Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer: Miracle Report
January 19 – May 11, 2014

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer explored the miraculous through people’s perceptions of it in their lives, interviewing students, school children and community members of all ages and backgrounds. They combined their findings in an installation of fleeting vignettes playing on all of the available sound and video equipment in the museum’s possession. In the words of the artists, “Our installation strives to embody some beauty, some hocus-pocus and some unexplainable magic.”

More details on the exhibition can be found at:
https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/2014/01/10/julianne-swartz-and-ken-landauer-miracle-report/


INTERNal Affairs: The Writing on the Wall (Banksy Talk Review)

February 18, 2014

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

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What is art? Is it hanging in a gallery? Is it made in a studio by hands that are finely tuned and well trained? Should it depict beauty? Should it represent an idea? Every generation conventionalizes a standard of “art” based on a definition ultimately defined by the critic. It has become the artist’s role to first establish these norms then defy them. Outspoken, cheeky, and veiled, the graffiti artist Banksy stands at the forefront of the contemporary fight for unconventional art. The British based street artist spent last October in New York during a “residency” in which he installed a new work each day. His imposition in the self-proclaimed art capital of America earned Banksy the scorn and smite from many of the city’s most reputable critics. However, artist, critic, and contributing editor to Art In America, Carol Diehl puts her well-earned reputation on the line to not only disagree with her colleagues, but to publically defend Banksy’s philosophy. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of Grand Central Art Center’s John Spiak along with Cal State Fullerton’s Chair of Visual Art Jade Jewett and Professor Joanna Roche, the main campus hosted the public debut of Diehl’s insights into the man who is the masked satirist. If you had the extreme misfortune of missing this talk, fret no longer! As always, you can experience it through me, your GCAC intern.

From blogs to print, during his “residency,” Banksy was reviled as what New York based critic Jerry Saltz calls, “amazingly unoriginal.” But was originality really his objective? Diehl identifies Banksy’s themes as a compilation of anti’s: anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism, anti-greed, and anti-war.  With such motives Banksy’s end goal isn’t ingenuity, it’s awareness­­­­­­­­— he offers a new perspective on the status quo. Diehl went on to highlight the deeply humanistic qualities of Banksy’s work, supporting her observations with the fact that his work “vilifies no one.” Diehl chalks up his disdain amongst critics to the sad fact that we exist in a “culture that’s constantly pitting one side against another,” inspiring a legitimate confusion when we encounter an attitude that blames no one specifically.

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Diehl was careful not to disregard Banksy as the crude prankster that he is often made out to be. He is an artist with a message. His medium and surfaces are chosen concurrently with his ideals. Banksy is speaking out against the passive acceptance of a defined convention; he has to reach those who exist beyond the exclusivity of the tightly woven art world. Revolutions don’t happen from high rises, they happen in the streets. Thus, Banksy rids his work of pretense by using graffiti as his medium and existing utilitarian surfaces as his canvases.  He mocks the capitalist establishment while reaching his intended audience—everyone. He has taken his work out of the gallery and delivered it directly to the people.  I especially appreciated Diehl’s realization that graffiti is an illegal activity and as such, Banksy is literally risking his life to reach the public at large.

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So what is art? Well I suppose that it is ultimately up to the viewers to decide, whether that be an experienced critic or an observant passer-by. Through the in-depth analysis provided by Carol Diehl, this intern is convinced that Banksy is not only an artist, but one of the great artists of our time. Intelligent and provoking, Banksy’s work must be experienced in its entirety. It is not just the image we see painted on a wall that demands contemplation, but the message deeply plaited within. He speaks a language understood by all and strips us of our differences; his work can be absurd because human beings are absurd, it can provoke laughter because we are all capable of humor, it questions normalcy because that is something that should be decided by the individual, not the committee. With a little help from Diehl and other Banksy advocates in the field, perhaps he will not be misunderstood much longer.

Well that’s my two-cents. If you missed the talk with Carol Diehl, this blog certainly does not do it justice. Hopefully we will be hearing more from Carol and with any luck her lecture will surface again soon. This is your GCAC intern, over and out.



Meg Linton Pays GCAC a Visit!

February 14, 2014

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Meg Linton stopped by Grand Central Art Center this week for a visit.  Meg is the Director of Galleries and Exhibitions at OTIS and their Ben Maltz Gallery, where she is presenting the current exhibition Binding Desire: Unfolding Artists Books through March 30.

Meg also happens to be alum of California State University, Fullerton’s Exhibition Design/Museum Studies program and a former creative in residence here at Grand Central Art Center.

We are truly looking forward to her upcoming exhibition, Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quadthe second in her multi-year Freeway Studies series,  The series focuses on contemporary artists working in specific regions of Los Angeles.  Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quad features the work of 34 contemporary artists whose studios are located within the borders of the I-405, 110, 10, and 105 freeways in Los Angeles.

THANK YOU MEG, you continue to make us proud!


More GCAC Visitors – Rijin Sahakian and Amitis Motevalli

February 8, 2014

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Great individuals keep stopping by Grand Central Art Center for a visit.  Today, we were honored to have curator Rijin Sahakian and Los Angeles based artist Amitis Motevalli stop by for the afternoon.

Rijin is in Los Angeles for the next year working on an exhibition with the LA Dept of Cultural Affairs on contemporary Islamic art and teaching a class at CalArts.

Amitis’ work has “centered on signage and symbology from Iranian and Islamic/Shia art and how they are significant in the construction of histories through documentation.”

What a pleasure to have them here at GCAC!


BANKSY: COMPLETED – Feb 13 @ 7PM with Carol Diehl – CSUF Main Campus

February 3, 2014

BANKSY: COMPLETED

Carol Diehl
Art in America, Contributing Editor

FEBRUARY 13, 7PM
California State University, Fullerton
MAIN CAMPUS
Lecture Hall – VA 113
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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Each day last October, the British street artist known as Banksy left his mark on New York City, hitting all five boroughs in a self-styled “residency” that included paintings on walls, roving theme trucks, videos on his website, sculptures and more—leaving fans delighted and critics enraged. Artist and art critic Carol Diehl follows Banksy’s clues to explore the overarching philosophies that drive this prankster, who calls himself a “good vandal.”

Among the galleries and museum where Diehl has exhibited her work, are the Sidney Janis Gallery, Hirschl & Adler Modern, and Gary Snyder Fine Art, the Queens Museum of Art, the Aldrich Museum and, in 2012, the Berkshire Museum in Massachusetts. She is the recipient of artists’ fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the New York Foundation for the Arts.

A Contributing Editor to Art in America, Diehl has written cover stories on Robert Irwin, Olafur Eliasson, Christian Marclay and Wolfgang Laib. Her writing has also been published in, among others, ARTnews, Art & Auction, and New York Magazine. In 2012 she received a fellowship from the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation for her blog, Art Vent.

Diehl has served on the faculties of Bennington College (VT) and the Graduate Fine Arts Program of the School of Visual Arts (NYC). She lives in New York City and Southwestern Massachusetts.

Presented by Grand Central Art Center
A Unit of CSUF, College of the Arts