FALL SEASON PREVIEW – Grand Central Art Center

September 20, 2013

FALL SEASON PREVIEW
Exhibitions / Artist in Residence / Theatre

EXHIBITIONS

Adriana

 

 

 

 

Adriana Salazar: Nothing Else Left
2013 California-Pacific Triennial Partnership with Orange County Museum of Art
through September 22, 2013

Is there an end to our existence? Can we be separated from our bodies and be transformed into something else? Adriana Salazar’s work has continued to revolve around these questions in different ways. This is why the realm of mortuary customs appeals to her: it presents numerous ways to approach the ultimate unknown.

During a two-month residency at Grand Central Art Center, the artist desired to go deeper into that moment of transition between life and death, finding out as much as she could about what happens with our bodies, with our consciousness and with everything we build around the death of others. In her words, “I found, amongst other things, that there is an aesthetics of transition, that there are rituals trying to maintain life after death, and laws which govern our bodies, even when we are not fully present. I also found out that there are transitional techniques and an intricate industry around them.”

Salazar has decided to rescue as many cremated artificial body parts possible. These parts remain as solid as they were inside their bodies and are nevertheless considered residue. She found their value in this very ambiguity. They embody the question of the status of our own existence on a physical level: their materiality creates confusion between those objects as parts of a physical body and our own body, thus opening the gap between our certainties and uncertainties, beyond the matter of human death itself.

Beatriz

 

 

 

 

Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine
through October 13, 2013

The Time Machine is an installation that explores the dual realities of a first world metropolis, Los Angeles, and of urban space in a developing region of the world, in this case San Salvador. These spaces coexist in the same hemisphere, separated by over 2,300 miles. However, they have strong connections to one another through labor and culture. Los Angeles is home to the largest Salvadoran population outside of the capital city of San Salvador.

Cortez’s work explores memory and loss in the aftermath of a war and in relation to the experience of immigration. Her installation conveys the experience of an immigrant who lives in Los Angeles, but who simultaneously inhabits another reality, that of one’s own city of origin. As a result, the installation makes reference to a landscape of diverse layers, the superimposition of two urban realities. The outside wall of the room displays a video projection of the City of Los Angeles in the daylight, viewed from the Griffith Observatory. The inner space of The Time Machine, on the contrary, is dark and shows a view of the city of San Salvador at night. It is a space reminiscent of childhood and nostalgic memories – a childhood of an artist who was raised during a war torn period in Salvadoran history.

Eamonn

 

 

 

 

Eamonn Fox: Solo residency exhibition for the purposes of furthering my career
through October 13, 2013
Performance: October 5 from 7-10pm

Eamonn Fox solo residency exhibition… is a real time adventure in art making. The artist approaches the exhibition opportunity as a fluid series of related events, as opposed to an exercise in the arrangement of static objects. Featuring sculpture, photography, printmaking, painting, and performance in a bizarre and unpredictable rotation – the artist hopes to engage audiences on a personal level, one individual at a time. Taking time away from his day-job, Fox plans to be in “residence” and on site during gallery hours (as much as possible) to collaborate with patrons, field questions or perhaps play darts. Without a discernable strategy in terms of “big picture” meaning making, content is variable and specific to individual works. As fleeting, fast and dynamic as contemporary life is, the exhibition aims to be an enlivened site of exchange – nimble enough to adapt to news items, world events and local engagement through the constant development/arrival of un-predetermined artworks and programming.

matthew braden

 

 

 

 

Matthew Moore and Braden King: Cumulus
Residency/Exhibition with support of the Metabolic Studio
October 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014
Opening Reception: October 5 from 7-10pm

The journey of water is not a foreign concept to artist Matthew Moore; it is actually central to generations of his family’s lively hood. For without the control of water, it would have been impossible for Moore to become the fourth generation of farmers in his family, sowing land in what would otherwise be considered hostile desert environment of western Phoenix, Arizona.

Through his artistic practice, Moore has found his artistic voice, while at the same time coming to a realization – the actions of taking raw desert/native land, converting it into fertile farming land by diverting water, and creating infrastructures, actually provides the perfect environment for suburban sprawl to occur. He also realized that his practice of farming this land might actually exploit more natural resources than the subdivisions he was so quick to criticize.

Matthew Moore has invited filmmaker/artist Braden King to collaborate through residency at Grand Central Art Center. They have spent time traveling the LA Aqueduct route from Central to Southern California. Along the way they’ve reflecting upon its impact, connecting and having conversations with individuals who live, work and engage this structure on daily bases. Informed by these experiences, the artists will create a major site-specific installation, marking the aqueduct’s 100th anniversary on November 5, 2013.

Major funding support for this project provided by Metabolic Studio.

Tim

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Youd: “Performing” A Scanner Darkly
Throughout November 2013

Novelist Philip K. Dick lived the latter part of his life, and died, in Santa Ana. During his time in Santa Ana, he wrote some of his most highly acclaimed work. One of these late classics is A Scanner Darkly, a semi-autobiographical novel of drug use and paranoia set in a dystopian Orange County of the then near future (he wrote the novel in 1977, setting it in the mid 1990s).

Artist Tim Youd will “perform” A Scanner Darkly over the course of a 2 to 4 week period in the Grand Central Art Center lobby as part of his new series of novel/typewriter based work.

Aili

 

 

 

 

 

Aili Schmeltz: Cross Cut
November 2, 2013 – February 9, 2014
Opening Reception: November 2 from 7-10pm

Cross Cut, from Aili Schmeltz’s Tomorrowland series, explores the idea that utopia can be considered not only a place or a goal, but also as the very act of striving for such a target. Schmeltz’s hybridized structures are materializations, remnants of an ideal that never was and may never be. As fallen monuments to a utopic philosophy, they function as relics of both a “good place” and “no place.” Part architectural, part fossil, part potential: these works utilize discarded building materials that appear to have crystallized within a ‘natural’ process—strata that have undergone philosophical transformation yet to be fulfilled.

Marvin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome
Organized by Marvin Chow, CSUF MFA in illustration
November 2, 2013 – February 9, 2014
Opening Reception: November 2 from 7-10pm

An exhibition representing both in-game artwork, concept artwork and fan artwork as it relates to Rage Bear – a concept involving a Bibi bear whose specialty juggling skills allow him to juggle ridiculous amount of objects when he gets angry. Through the invitation of Marvin Chow, 30 Los Angeles-based entertainment artists will develop work for the exhibition, creating part of the Rage Bear storyline in their own personal style.

Julianne Ken

 

 

 

 

 

Miracle Report: Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer
January 18 – May 11, 2014
Opening Reception: February 1 from 7-10pm

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer spent their Social Studies residency at the Arizona State University Art Museum looking for miracles. The artists explored the miraculous through people’s perceptions of it in their lives, interviewing students, school children and community members of all ages and backgrounds. They combined their findings in an installation of fleeting vignettes playing on all of the available sound and video equipment in the museum’s possession. In the words of the artists, “Our installation will strive to embody some beauty, some hocus-pocus and some unexplainable magic.”

Initiated by John D. Spiak, this project was realized at the ASU Art Museum and supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts as part of the Social Studies series. Upon Spiak’s departure to accept his new position at Grand Central Art Center, Heather Sealy Lineberry curated the exhibition at ASU Art Museum with curatorial assistance from Nicole Herden.

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

(Cog•nate Collective) Amy Sanchez and Misael Diaz
Eamonn Fox
Matthew Moore and Braden King
Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer
Holly Myers
Tim Youd
Vincent Goudreau
Daniel Tucker
Heather Layton and Brian Bailey

GRAND CENTRAL THEATRE

theatre

 

 

 

 

 

Fall Show #1 – ALMOST, MAINE
by John Cariani
Directed by Kari Hayter
The residents of and visitors to the tiny mythical town of Almost, Maine are falling in and out of love.
“An all encompassing globe of love: puppy love, hidden passion, love lost, burgeoning love, and many that fall in-between.” Amanda Gunther MD Theatre Guide
Performs 8pm 10/4, 10/5, 10/10, 10/11, 10/12, 10/16, 10/17, 10/18, 10/19
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#maine

Fall Show #2 – THE SUBMISSION
by Jeff Talbot
Directed by Mark Ramont
A raw, unsentimental play about race and gender exposing quiet prejudice and intolerance in the theatre.
“A mischievous dance across the minefield of affirmative action in the arts” David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter
Performs 8pm 10/25, 10/26, 10/31, 11/1, 11/2, 11/6, 11/7, 11/8, 11/9
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#submission

Fall Show #3 –ILLYRIA
Book, music, and lyrics by Pete Mills
Directed by Kari Hayter
Illyria is a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.
Performs 8pm 11/15, 11/16, 11/21, 11/22, 11/23 (dark Fall Break) 12/4, 12/5, 12/6, 12/7
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#cradle

MISSION

Grand Central Art Center is dedicated to the investigation and engagement of contemporary art and visual culture – regionally, nationallyand internationally – through unique collaborations between artists, students and the community.

SUPPORT
Grand Central Art Center programs are made possible with the generous support provided by:
Metabolic Studio
Efroymson Family Fund
William Gillespie Foundation
Fainbarg-Chase Families
Memphis at the Santora
An anonymous donor
The Yost Theatre
Memphis @ The Santora
Community Collaborative Partners

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER
Quality exhibitions, programs and outreach of Grand Central Art Center are made possible through the generous support of individuals like you.

MAKE A DONATION TODAY – Support GCAC for Continued Success!
Please call Tracey Gayer @ 714.567.7233

GALLERY HOURS
Closed Mondays and Holidays
Tuesdays – Sundays 11.00 am – 4.00 pm.
Extended hours: Friday & Saturday 11.00am – 7.00 pm.
(First Saturday of the month galleries are open until 10.00 pm)
http://www.grandcentralartcenter.com/maps.php

Thank you for your continued engagement and support!

Grand Central Art Center
a unit of Cal State University Fullerton’s College of the Arts
125 N. Broadway
Santa Ana, CA 92701
t. 714.567.7233
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Mobility Device: Carmen Papalia Performance with Century HS Marching Band @ GCAC

May 13, 2013

Mobility Device
A Performance by Carmen Papalia
with accompaniment of The Great Centurion Marching Band from Century High School, Santa Ana

Saturday, June 1, 2013
Begins 6PM @ Grand Central Art Center

carmen-marching-band-2Carmen Papalia image credit:  Jordan Reznick
 

ARTIST CARMEN PAPALIA’S OWN WORDS:
Excerpt from A New Model for Access in the Museum

In my second year of college I really started to care about access—my own access in particular. It was hard not to care. I was coming to terms with a progressive vision loss that made it difficult for me to read printed text—which, at the time, I had to do quite a lot since I was an English student and a magazine editor. I remember giving myself a headache every time I struggled to focus on a poem, and, more often than not, stressing over more editing work than I could manage. I privileged my access to the visual world so much that it was bad for me.

I eventually chose to rely on the accessibility accommodations that were available to me as a full-fledged disabled person, but it soon became clear, even while accommodated, that my access was vastly different from that of my peers. Shopping for groceries with an assistant was weird. The audio description for movies sucked. I couldn’t walk into a library, select a book and start reading. I constantly felt limited by the systems that I had chose to rely on because I hadn’t yet claimed agency and established a system for my own access.

In one of my first published poems about blindness (West Coast Line, 2010), I wrote a list of synonyms for the word “blind”. It’s a pretty accurate reflection of how I was feeling at the time:

I am: careless, heedless (ran into a pole), ignorant, imperceptive, inattentive (don’t look directly), inconsiderate (don’t look directly), indifferent, indiscriminate (can’t judge by appearance), injudicious, insensitive (have hurt the feelings of others), myopic, nearsighted (used to be), neglectful, oblivious (addressed an inanimate object), thoughtless, unaware (impeded on a bike lane), unconscious, undiscerning, unmindful, unobservant (especially of visual cues), unperceiving, unreasoning, unseeing (sometimes).  I am: hasty (I often cross too early), heedless, impetuous, inconsiderate (I often cut off buggies and the elderly), irrational, mindless, rash, reckless (I have walked without a cane), senseless (I have driven a motor vehicle), shortsighted, thoughtless, unseeing, unthinking, violent, wild (I have driven a motor vehicle), I am: blocked, closed, closed at one end, concealed, dark, a dead-end, dim, disguised, impassable, leading nowhere, obscured, obstructed, secluded, unmarked, without exit.

Feeling all of these things, I started to use a white cane—a symbol that I felt good and bad about. On one hand, it was a tool that promoted my access and mobility. It showed me things and made my map a whole lot bigger. On the other hand, it institutionalized me. It was a symbol that was connected to an institution that wanted me to be a certain kind of blind person—the kind with huge sunglasses, the kind that was either a piano tuner or a masseuse, the kind that walks a certain way on a predetermined route, and that talks a certain way about his blindness. The kind that you never saw but which you knew existed.

THE SANTA ANA PERFORMANCE:
Mobility Device is a performance in which artist Carmen Papalia is accompanied by a marching band that replaces his white cane as his primary means of gathering information about his surroundings. As part of this site specific performance of Mobility Device for the Grand Central Art Center, Papalia will explore downtown Santa Ana while The Great Centurion Marching Band from Century High School in Santa Ana provides musical cues indicating objects, obstacles and other information that might be relevant to the artist on his journey. As a piece of music, Mobility Device is an extension of the musicality of the white cane—bringing attention to the things that the white cane, on any occasion, might touch into sound. With Mobility Device, fixtures such as curbs, lampposts and sandwich boards become notes in the soundscape of a place. Alternately, Mobility Device proposes the possibility of user-generated, creative process-based systems of access. It represents a non-institutional (and non-institutionalizing) temporary solution for the problem that is the white cane.  The community is invited to join the performance.

ABOUT THE GREAT CENTURION MARCHING BAND:
The Great Centurion Marching Band from Century High School in Santa Ana is in its second year under the direction of R. Scott Devoe. They perform during football game halftime shows, community events and parades. The Marching Band is seeking sponsorships and donations to help fund various activities and operations costs. Please contact the director at richard.devoe@sausd.us for more information.

KCET PREVIEW ARTICLE
Grand Central Art Center thanks KCET’s ARTBOUND and writer Carolina A. Miranda for the outstanding preview article on Carmen’s performance.  You can find the article at the following link:
http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/orange/carmen-papalia-grand-central-art-center.html

DOCUMENTARY VIDEO
A video documentary of the performance, by filmmaker Mickey Fisher, is being created, so keep checking the GCAC Blog for its completion.