Update on Recordings of an Immigrant – A Project by Vincent Goudreau

August 6, 2014

We wanted to provide you with a little update on Vincent Goudreau, who was artist in residence at GCAC last fall. As you may recall, Vincent was here at GCAC working on the early development of his project Recordings of an Immigrant. The residency proved to be a very productive time, and the project continues to develop in positive ways.

Screen shot 2014-08-06 at 11.28.35 AM

A NEW SCROLLING WEBSITE was just placed online this week, so we thought we would share that link. (use the scroll bar on the right of your browser to navigate down the page).
http://recordingsofanimmigrant.com/

Recordings of an Immigrant is a non-fiction narrative, which inspired a multidisciplinary project including a book compiled from transcribed audio recordings. This is a survival story of Juan Aquino’s journey from the genocide of Guatemala to the courtrooms of the United States.

The project is supported through the artist in residence program of Grand Central Art Center, a unit of California State University, Fullerton’s College of the Arts, with funding support provided by an anonymous donor and from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Vincent will be returning as artist in residence at GCAC from November through December to continue his work on the project, developing the last of the prints, as well as final edits and design of the publication.

We look forward to having you over to GCAC for a visit with Vincent!


Andy Warhol Foundation Awards GCAC $100,000

July 2, 2014

GCAC LOGO NEW 1

Grant to support Grand Central Art Center
Artist-in-Residence Program

Santa Ana, California, July 1, 2014 – Cal State Fullerton’s Grand Central Art Center has been awarded a $100,000 grant (over two years) from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts to support its artist-in-residence program.

“It is an honor for Grand Central Art Center to receive funding support from this important foundation that continues to focus its resources on forward-thinking institutions, initiatives and artists,” said GCAC’s Director and Chief Curator, John D. Spiak.

The Warhol Foundation’s grant making activity is focused on serving the needs of artists by funding the institutions that support them. Grants are made for scholarly exhibitions at museums; curatorial research; visual arts programming at artist-centered organizations; artist residencies and commissions; arts writing; and efforts to promote the health, welfare and first amendment rights of artists.

GCAC’s artist-in-residence program is artist driven, with a focus on discovery, creative process and relationships through collaborative and socially engaged practices. “The generosity of The Andy Warhol Foundation’s financial support provides the opportunity for the Grand Central Art Center to continue forward momentum for the artist-in-residence program, empowering artists to realize their visions,” Spiak said.

Residency lengths are determined on a project-by-project basis. GCAC residencies to date have lasted from three weeks to longer than a year, including the ongoing project by Cog•nate Collective (Amy Sanchez and Misael Diaz) currently moving into year two. Residencies are not required to occur on-site, but provide the openness and opportunity for projects to be realized at off-site locations throughout the community, region and beyond.

GCAC presently is partnering with Social Practices Art Network (SPAN) on a new podcast series. Carol A. Stakenas, SPAN curator, will be interviewing artists and collectives that are participating in GCAC’s artist-in-residency program, with numerous conversations from the time artists are invited through the completion of their residency. This project is dedicated to capturing and cultivating creative voices in the field to deepen critical understanding and share methodologies.

Artists confirmed to realize projects through an artist-in-residence with Grand Central Art Center include: Lisa Bielawa, Paul Ramirez Jonas, Aida Šehović, Joseph Delappe, and Vincent Goudreau.

Presently in residence/exhibition, through her Wild Times off-site journey on the Pacific Crest Trail, is artist Susan Robb. Upcoming artist-in-residence event activities include: Daniel Tucker‘s ongoing project Future Perfect: Times Capsules in Reagan Country, returning July 11-13 to present a time capsule ceremony in collaboration with the Teen Program of the Santa Ana Public Library; Heather Layton and Brian Bailey’s ongoing project 59 Days of Independence, returning August 8-17 to present a project in collaboration with students from Orange County School of the Arts, Orange County Pakistani Parents Association, and youth in Pakistan via Skype – with materials presented in Spanish, English, and Urdu.

About Grand Central Art Center
Established in 1999 as a joint venture with the City of Santa Ana, Grand Central Art Center, a unit of California State University at Fullerton’s College of the Arts, is dedicated to the investigation and promotion of contemporary art and visual culture: regionally, nationally, and internationally through unique collaborations among artists, students and the community.

The Grand Central Art Center Artist-in-Residence program provides a dedicated apartment and studio to creative individuals through the invitation of the center’s director/curatorial team. The current emphasis of the residency program focuses on artists working in social engaged practices. GCAC residencies provide time and space away from one’s normal work environment and community, creating the opportunity for expanded collaboration, exchange, growth, resources, knowledge and discovery.

MORE INFORMATION ON GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER CAN BE FOUND AT GRANDCENTRALARTCENTER.WORDPRESS.COM


FALL SEASON PREVIEW – Grand Central Art Center

September 20, 2013

FALL SEASON PREVIEW
Exhibitions / Artist in Residence / Theatre

EXHIBITIONS

Adriana

 

 

 

 

Adriana Salazar: Nothing Else Left
2013 California-Pacific Triennial Partnership with Orange County Museum of Art
through September 22, 2013

Is there an end to our existence? Can we be separated from our bodies and be transformed into something else? Adriana Salazar’s work has continued to revolve around these questions in different ways. This is why the realm of mortuary customs appeals to her: it presents numerous ways to approach the ultimate unknown.

During a two-month residency at Grand Central Art Center, the artist desired to go deeper into that moment of transition between life and death, finding out as much as she could about what happens with our bodies, with our consciousness and with everything we build around the death of others. In her words, “I found, amongst other things, that there is an aesthetics of transition, that there are rituals trying to maintain life after death, and laws which govern our bodies, even when we are not fully present. I also found out that there are transitional techniques and an intricate industry around them.”

Salazar has decided to rescue as many cremated artificial body parts possible. These parts remain as solid as they were inside their bodies and are nevertheless considered residue. She found their value in this very ambiguity. They embody the question of the status of our own existence on a physical level: their materiality creates confusion between those objects as parts of a physical body and our own body, thus opening the gap between our certainties and uncertainties, beyond the matter of human death itself.

Beatriz

 

 

 

 

Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine
through October 13, 2013

The Time Machine is an installation that explores the dual realities of a first world metropolis, Los Angeles, and of urban space in a developing region of the world, in this case San Salvador. These spaces coexist in the same hemisphere, separated by over 2,300 miles. However, they have strong connections to one another through labor and culture. Los Angeles is home to the largest Salvadoran population outside of the capital city of San Salvador.

Cortez’s work explores memory and loss in the aftermath of a war and in relation to the experience of immigration. Her installation conveys the experience of an immigrant who lives in Los Angeles, but who simultaneously inhabits another reality, that of one’s own city of origin. As a result, the installation makes reference to a landscape of diverse layers, the superimposition of two urban realities. The outside wall of the room displays a video projection of the City of Los Angeles in the daylight, viewed from the Griffith Observatory. The inner space of The Time Machine, on the contrary, is dark and shows a view of the city of San Salvador at night. It is a space reminiscent of childhood and nostalgic memories – a childhood of an artist who was raised during a war torn period in Salvadoran history.

Eamonn

 

 

 

 

Eamonn Fox: Solo residency exhibition for the purposes of furthering my career
through October 13, 2013
Performance: October 5 from 7-10pm

Eamonn Fox solo residency exhibition… is a real time adventure in art making. The artist approaches the exhibition opportunity as a fluid series of related events, as opposed to an exercise in the arrangement of static objects. Featuring sculpture, photography, printmaking, painting, and performance in a bizarre and unpredictable rotation – the artist hopes to engage audiences on a personal level, one individual at a time. Taking time away from his day-job, Fox plans to be in “residence” and on site during gallery hours (as much as possible) to collaborate with patrons, field questions or perhaps play darts. Without a discernable strategy in terms of “big picture” meaning making, content is variable and specific to individual works. As fleeting, fast and dynamic as contemporary life is, the exhibition aims to be an enlivened site of exchange – nimble enough to adapt to news items, world events and local engagement through the constant development/arrival of un-predetermined artworks and programming.

matthew braden

 

 

 

 

Matthew Moore and Braden King: Cumulus
Residency/Exhibition with support of the Metabolic Studio
October 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014
Opening Reception: October 5 from 7-10pm

The journey of water is not a foreign concept to artist Matthew Moore; it is actually central to generations of his family’s lively hood. For without the control of water, it would have been impossible for Moore to become the fourth generation of farmers in his family, sowing land in what would otherwise be considered hostile desert environment of western Phoenix, Arizona.

Through his artistic practice, Moore has found his artistic voice, while at the same time coming to a realization – the actions of taking raw desert/native land, converting it into fertile farming land by diverting water, and creating infrastructures, actually provides the perfect environment for suburban sprawl to occur. He also realized that his practice of farming this land might actually exploit more natural resources than the subdivisions he was so quick to criticize.

Matthew Moore has invited filmmaker/artist Braden King to collaborate through residency at Grand Central Art Center. They have spent time traveling the LA Aqueduct route from Central to Southern California. Along the way they’ve reflecting upon its impact, connecting and having conversations with individuals who live, work and engage this structure on daily bases. Informed by these experiences, the artists will create a major site-specific installation, marking the aqueduct’s 100th anniversary on November 5, 2013.

Major funding support for this project provided by Metabolic Studio.

Tim

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Youd: “Performing” A Scanner Darkly
Throughout November 2013

Novelist Philip K. Dick lived the latter part of his life, and died, in Santa Ana. During his time in Santa Ana, he wrote some of his most highly acclaimed work. One of these late classics is A Scanner Darkly, a semi-autobiographical novel of drug use and paranoia set in a dystopian Orange County of the then near future (he wrote the novel in 1977, setting it in the mid 1990s).

Artist Tim Youd will “perform” A Scanner Darkly over the course of a 2 to 4 week period in the Grand Central Art Center lobby as part of his new series of novel/typewriter based work.

Aili

 

 

 

 

 

Aili Schmeltz: Cross Cut
November 2, 2013 – February 9, 2014
Opening Reception: November 2 from 7-10pm

Cross Cut, from Aili Schmeltz’s Tomorrowland series, explores the idea that utopia can be considered not only a place or a goal, but also as the very act of striving for such a target. Schmeltz’s hybridized structures are materializations, remnants of an ideal that never was and may never be. As fallen monuments to a utopic philosophy, they function as relics of both a “good place” and “no place.” Part architectural, part fossil, part potential: these works utilize discarded building materials that appear to have crystallized within a ‘natural’ process—strata that have undergone philosophical transformation yet to be fulfilled.

Marvin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome
Organized by Marvin Chow, CSUF MFA in illustration
November 2, 2013 – February 9, 2014
Opening Reception: November 2 from 7-10pm

An exhibition representing both in-game artwork, concept artwork and fan artwork as it relates to Rage Bear – a concept involving a Bibi bear whose specialty juggling skills allow him to juggle ridiculous amount of objects when he gets angry. Through the invitation of Marvin Chow, 30 Los Angeles-based entertainment artists will develop work for the exhibition, creating part of the Rage Bear storyline in their own personal style.

Julianne Ken

 

 

 

 

 

Miracle Report: Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer
January 18 – May 11, 2014
Opening Reception: February 1 from 7-10pm

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer spent their Social Studies residency at the Arizona State University Art Museum looking for miracles. The artists explored the miraculous through people’s perceptions of it in their lives, interviewing students, school children and community members of all ages and backgrounds. They combined their findings in an installation of fleeting vignettes playing on all of the available sound and video equipment in the museum’s possession. In the words of the artists, “Our installation will strive to embody some beauty, some hocus-pocus and some unexplainable magic.”

Initiated by John D. Spiak, this project was realized at the ASU Art Museum and supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts as part of the Social Studies series. Upon Spiak’s departure to accept his new position at Grand Central Art Center, Heather Sealy Lineberry curated the exhibition at ASU Art Museum with curatorial assistance from Nicole Herden.

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

(Cog•nate Collective) Amy Sanchez and Misael Diaz
Eamonn Fox
Matthew Moore and Braden King
Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer
Holly Myers
Tim Youd
Vincent Goudreau
Daniel Tucker
Heather Layton and Brian Bailey

GRAND CENTRAL THEATRE

theatre

 

 

 

 

 

Fall Show #1 – ALMOST, MAINE
by John Cariani
Directed by Kari Hayter
The residents of and visitors to the tiny mythical town of Almost, Maine are falling in and out of love.
“An all encompassing globe of love: puppy love, hidden passion, love lost, burgeoning love, and many that fall in-between.” Amanda Gunther MD Theatre Guide
Performs 8pm 10/4, 10/5, 10/10, 10/11, 10/12, 10/16, 10/17, 10/18, 10/19
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#maine

Fall Show #2 – THE SUBMISSION
by Jeff Talbot
Directed by Mark Ramont
A raw, unsentimental play about race and gender exposing quiet prejudice and intolerance in the theatre.
“A mischievous dance across the minefield of affirmative action in the arts” David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter
Performs 8pm 10/25, 10/26, 10/31, 11/1, 11/2, 11/6, 11/7, 11/8, 11/9
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#submission

Fall Show #3 –ILLYRIA
Book, music, and lyrics by Pete Mills
Directed by Kari Hayter
Illyria is a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.
Performs 8pm 11/15, 11/16, 11/21, 11/22, 11/23 (dark Fall Break) 12/4, 12/5, 12/6, 12/7
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#cradle

MISSION

Grand Central Art Center is dedicated to the investigation and engagement of contemporary art and visual culture – regionally, nationallyand internationally – through unique collaborations between artists, students and the community.

SUPPORT
Grand Central Art Center programs are made possible with the generous support provided by:
Metabolic Studio
Efroymson Family Fund
William Gillespie Foundation
Fainbarg-Chase Families
Memphis at the Santora
An anonymous donor
The Yost Theatre
Memphis @ The Santora
Community Collaborative Partners

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER
Quality exhibitions, programs and outreach of Grand Central Art Center are made possible through the generous support of individuals like you.

MAKE A DONATION TODAY – Support GCAC for Continued Success!
Please call Tracey Gayer @ 714.567.7233

GALLERY HOURS
Closed Mondays and Holidays
Tuesdays – Sundays 11.00 am – 4.00 pm.
Extended hours: Friday & Saturday 11.00am – 7.00 pm.
(First Saturday of the month galleries are open until 10.00 pm)
http://www.grandcentralartcenter.com/maps.php

Thank you for your continued engagement and support!

Grand Central Art Center
a unit of Cal State University Fullerton’s College of the Arts
125 N. Broadway
Santa Ana, CA 92701
t. 714.567.7233
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