March 1st from 6-10pm – Opening Receptions, Public Program and Cookies @ GCAC!

February 19, 2014

Join us to kick-off the month with two new exhibitions, a public program and other activities celebrating our First Saturday Art Walk scheduled for March 1st – Public Program at 6pm, Opening Receptions from 7-10pm, Girl Scout Cookie Sales from 7-9pm.

Here is what we have planned to engage you…

PUBLIC PROGRAM – 6PM

The Life of an Artist sm
Feminism Today: Art and Life
panel discussion
March 1,  6PM
Grand Central Art Center A.I.R. Basement Studio

On March 1st, Life of An Artist (Ingrid Reeve, Barbara Milliorn and Evan Senn) will continue their dialogue with the public on what it means to be a feminist, a working female art professional, and more.

Through a panel discussion with some of Southern California’s prominent and influential female artists, art professionals, critics and professors, the Feminism Today: Art and Life panel presentation and conversation will focus on feminist art practices in both contemporary art and life. The women involved will open up to the public, and to Life of an Artist: a reality TV web series, in a discussion of how everyday life and art-making intersect.  Topics will include sexism, racism and/or the trials, tribulations or benefits of being a women, and feminists, as female art professionals have experienced in their respective artistic careers and personal lives.

Confirmed panelists include:

Carrie Yury: Carrie Yury is Head of Research and Insights at BeyondCurious, Inc., and she writes for the Huffington Post regularly. Yury is also a nationally-exhibited fine artist, mother, wife and feminist. She is based in Orange County, and is represented by the Sam Lee Gallery.

Micol Hebron: Micol Hebron is an interdisciplinary artist and is an Assistant Professor at Chapman University. She is the founder of the LA Art Girls, the (former) co-founder of the artist collective The Elizabeths, and a contributing editor at X-TRA Magazine. She lives and works in Los Angeles, where she is represented by Jancar Gallery. Her latest project is featured on the cover of Artillery Magazine this month.

Arzu Arda Kosar: Arzu Arda Kosar is an international artist now residing in Los Angeles. She is the founder of Yarn Bombing Los Angeles, a member of the MapConception. She is the co-founder of TransIstanbul Collective that worked with inner city youth in Istanbul, Turkey and co-founder of International Survey of Alternative Artscene that examined contemporary art practices outside of the museum-gallery system in different parts of the world.

Joanna Roche: Dr. Joanna Roche, published poet and Professor of Art History, is a specialist in contemporary art. She specializes in Modern Art, Theory and Practice in New Media, Methods and Historiography. Her publications include articles and reviews on Joseph Cornell, Goat Island, Carolee Schneemann, Cindy Sherman, Pipilotti Rist, Tom Nechtal, Christian Hill, Joe Forkan and Nobuhito Nishigawara. Her scholarship examines the interworkings of memory and making in contemporary art.

Carrie Paterson: Carrie Paterson is an artist, writer and professor whose work crosses interdisciplinary boundaries between the arts and sciences. Paterson has taught various courses at many universities in Southern California since 2001 in sculpture, expository writing, visual culture, and the narrative structures in contemporary culture. Paterson has contributed essays, reviews and critical articles to a variety of publications including Sculpture, Flash Art, X-TRA, Artillery and Artweek, and currently she is Reviews Editor for Artillery Magazine.


OPENING RECEPTIONS – 7 to 10PM

Heather and Amanda sm
Heather Bowling and Amanda Patenaude: You Are What You Concede
Curated by Kimberly McKinnis, CSUF MA in Exhibition and Design
OPENING RECEPTION – MARCH 1 from 7-10pm
March 1 through April 13, 2014

East Coast artist Amanda Pantenaude will team up with West Coast artist Heather Bowling, for a first time collaboration, creating a site-specific installation made from recycled materials collected within the Santa Ana community.  The artists are interested in social awareness and have created previous participatory projects in the hope to educate the public about current and pressing global issues.

The collection of materials will be organized through a series of community events, collaborating with local individuals and organizations. Hands-on workshops, panels and programs are being developed for the course of the exhibition.

Julia Haft-Candell sm
Julia Haft-Candell: Fast and Slow
Curated by Yevgeniya Mikhailik, GCAC Curatorial Associate
OPENING RECEPTION – MARCH 1 from 7-10pm
March 1 through May 11, 2014

Julia Haft-Candell‘s sculptures are physical records of their making, and a reflection of their own history. Using small components to build larger forms, the artist continually invents, reassesses and makes endless decisions about how the work takes shape. Ultimately the goal is to form a composition that most effectively speaks to the ambiguity of perception and the complexity of being.

Using forms inspired by nature and the body, as well as ideas derived from quick doodles and sketches, she focuses on the space in between two contrasting concepts as a metaphor for my experience as a human being. In Haft-Candell’s words “I express contradictions. I seek the intersection of the conscious and subconscious, construction and destruction, fast and slow, serious and funny, hard and soft.”


GIRL SCOUT COOKIES

Girl Scout Cookies

Grand Central Art Center welcomes Santa Ana Girl Scout Troop #2363, who will be selling cookies for $4/box, plus collecting donations for the Southwest Community Center (homeless shelter) throughout the evening.


CONTINUING EXHIBITION

JK

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer: Miracle Report
January 19 – May 11, 2014

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer explored the miraculous through people’s perceptions of it in their lives, interviewing students, school children and community members of all ages and backgrounds. They combined their findings in an installation of fleeting vignettes playing on all of the available sound and video equipment in the museum’s possession. In the words of the artists, “Our installation strives to embody some beauty, some hocus-pocus and some unexplainable magic.”

More details on the exhibition can be found at:
https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/2014/01/10/julianne-swartz-and-ken-landauer-miracle-report/


INTERNal Affairs: The Writing on the Wall (Banksy Talk Review)

February 18, 2014

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

carol banksy

What is art? Is it hanging in a gallery? Is it made in a studio by hands that are finely tuned and well trained? Should it depict beauty? Should it represent an idea? Every generation conventionalizes a standard of “art” based on a definition ultimately defined by the critic. It has become the artist’s role to first establish these norms then defy them. Outspoken, cheeky, and veiled, the graffiti artist Banksy stands at the forefront of the contemporary fight for unconventional art. The British based street artist spent last October in New York during a “residency” in which he installed a new work each day. His imposition in the self-proclaimed art capital of America earned Banksy the scorn and smite from many of the city’s most reputable critics. However, artist, critic, and contributing editor to Art In America, Carol Diehl puts her well-earned reputation on the line to not only disagree with her colleagues, but to publically defend Banksy’s philosophy. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of Grand Central Art Center’s John Spiak along with Cal State Fullerton’s Chair of Visual Art Jade Jewett and Professor Joanna Roche, the main campus hosted the public debut of Diehl’s insights into the man who is the masked satirist. If you had the extreme misfortune of missing this talk, fret no longer! As always, you can experience it through me, your GCAC intern.

From blogs to print, during his “residency,” Banksy was reviled as what New York based critic Jerry Saltz calls, “amazingly unoriginal.” But was originality really his objective? Diehl identifies Banksy’s themes as a compilation of anti’s: anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism, anti-greed, and anti-war.  With such motives Banksy’s end goal isn’t ingenuity, it’s awareness­­­­­­­­— he offers a new perspective on the status quo. Diehl went on to highlight the deeply humanistic qualities of Banksy’s work, supporting her observations with the fact that his work “vilifies no one.” Diehl chalks up his disdain amongst critics to the sad fact that we exist in a “culture that’s constantly pitting one side against another,” inspiring a legitimate confusion when we encounter an attitude that blames no one specifically.

carol banksy text

Diehl was careful not to disregard Banksy as the crude prankster that he is often made out to be. He is an artist with a message. His medium and surfaces are chosen concurrently with his ideals. Banksy is speaking out against the passive acceptance of a defined convention; he has to reach those who exist beyond the exclusivity of the tightly woven art world. Revolutions don’t happen from high rises, they happen in the streets. Thus, Banksy rids his work of pretense by using graffiti as his medium and existing utilitarian surfaces as his canvases.  He mocks the capitalist establishment while reaching his intended audience—everyone. He has taken his work out of the gallery and delivered it directly to the people.  I especially appreciated Diehl’s realization that graffiti is an illegal activity and as such, Banksy is literally risking his life to reach the public at large.

carol banksy rm

So what is art? Well I suppose that it is ultimately up to the viewers to decide, whether that be an experienced critic or an observant passer-by. Through the in-depth analysis provided by Carol Diehl, this intern is convinced that Banksy is not only an artist, but one of the great artists of our time. Intelligent and provoking, Banksy’s work must be experienced in its entirety. It is not just the image we see painted on a wall that demands contemplation, but the message deeply plaited within. He speaks a language understood by all and strips us of our differences; his work can be absurd because human beings are absurd, it can provoke laughter because we are all capable of humor, it questions normalcy because that is something that should be decided by the individual, not the committee. With a little help from Diehl and other Banksy advocates in the field, perhaps he will not be misunderstood much longer.

Well that’s my two-cents. If you missed the talk with Carol Diehl, this blog certainly does not do it justice. Hopefully we will be hearing more from Carol and with any luck her lecture will surface again soon. This is your GCAC intern, over and out.



INTERNal Affairs: Life is Like a Thanksgiving Feast

November 25, 2013

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

The holidays are upon us my Internet friends! Thanksgiving is just days away, which means Christmas is just around the corner (try not to panic too much you last minute shoppers). As I sit wrapped in my scarf and bundled in my coat in attempt to beat this California winter, I have decided to stop complaining about the bitter chill of sixty degrees and instead take a moment to consider something for which I am thankful.

Fish Tacos

While there are many things I enjoy; fish tacos, movies based on young adult book series, fish tacos, my wool coat, my scooter, fish tacos and my black boots, there is still one thing that I am thankful for far beyond anything else, and that thing is YOU. As a frequenter of the art world, it is no secret that my passions lie in the products of the creative mind. However, in considering this notion, another thought sprang upon me: I’m passionate about the product of any mind! Creativity is a human quality that we all utilize in various forms. It is what F. Scott Fitzgerald calls the “inexhaustible variety of life;” the fact that we are each unique; we are all our own, unlike any other there was, is, or ever will be. There is no possible way to recreate the exact circumstances which make you, you. And because of this, I am constantly flabbergasted, bewildered, amused, and entertained, over and over again.

Micro

My position as intern here at Grand Central Art Center has afforded me the opportunity to experience art as it is today. My jaw dropped when I first experience Cumulus, the gargantuan homage to the L.A. Aqueduct by Braden King and Matthew Moore. My mind spun and my side ached from fits of laughter after a walk through Eamonn Fox’s tongue-in-cheek exhibition. My heart ached as I fully absorbed the weight of the message embodied in Beatriz Cortez’s Time Machine. But art is not something simply hung from the walls. Art is everywhere and art is everything. My jaw also drops in awe of my microwave that can cook my potatoes in three minutes. The Dyson Airblade Hand Dryer is arguably the greatest invention of the last decade and I am overwhelmed with wonder and excitement every time that dryer returns my hands to me without the slightest hint of water. Every time I wheel my luggage from terminal to terminal I am beside myself with appreciation for whoever decided to fasten wheels to my over-packed suitcase. The bottom line is that we, as the human race, are great. Whether you’re Henry Ford or Pablo Picasso, the things we produce and the actions we take allow us to help each other experience that full spectrum of emotion. I am so thankful that we are all different and all bring our own homemade dish to this thanksgiving feast of life, it all looks so delicious and I want to try everything! I am never bored and always amazed and it is all because of YOU.

So thank you whoever decided to fry that fish and blanket it in a tortilla, bravo! Thank you shoemaker who cut the boots precisely to the height I prefer, wonderfully done! Thank you automotive company in Italy who knows how to package fun on two wheels, amazing! Thank you J.K. Rowling and Stephanie Meyer and Suzanne Collins, your literary geniuses translated beautifully on the silver screen, a most excellent feat! And thank you, you! We are all in this together and you are making it one heck of a journey. This is your grateful GCAC intern, over and out.




INTERNal Affairs: Too Much Good Stuff

November 5, 2013

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

Happy autumn my Internet friends! The winds of the season are blowing and bringing with them exciting changes! I’m not talking about the turning of the leaves or the coming of the clouds; no, I’m afraid those wonders are dimmed by the new exhibitions here at Grand Central Art Center. As I’m sure you’ve learned through various experiences with tantalizing El Pollo Loco commercials that lead to excessive salivating and a broken nose from an attempt to smell your television screen– nothing compares to the real thing. Yet there are still those of you who choose to experience Santa Ana’s Saturday Art Walks through me! While I am indeed flattered, you have no idea what you’re missing. The liveliness is not something that can be efficaciously communicated through a brief recreation of the evening. As GCAC’s dutiful intern and your faithful reporter, I will once again do my best to bring the evening to you. For those of you that did attend (yes, over 2,200 of you), let’s take this opportunity to relive that wonderful evening together, shall we?

encinitas rage bear

ocma john in aili

Alright, so there was Matthew Moore and Braden King’s Cumulus, Aili Schmeltz: Cross Cut, Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome organized by Marvin Chow, the Ceramics and Glass exhibition, Tim Youd’s performance of A Scanner Darkly, A Ryman Arts The Big Draw, the Dia De Los Muertos show by the CSUF MFA students hosted by Memphis at the Santora, Artist in Residence Vincent Goudreau roaming the halls, guest appearances by the mayor and city council members of both Santa Ana and Encinitas, and a VIP visit from friends at Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) with their Senior Curator Dan Cameron. Got it all? Was it as if you were standing next to me greeting our illustrious patrons? I hope so, because that’s all I have for you today art lovers.

Just kidding. All of those were indeed components of last Saturday’s delightful event, but allow me to elaborate on my experience with each.

OCMA dan tim john

We had a full house of new activity here at GCAC! The foyer was bustling with activity as the two front gallery spaces each boasted new pieces. The masses began to flood the typewriter-laden hallways (I’ll explain that in a moment), headed by a group from the wonderful OCMA and collectors group. Dan Cameron and Genny Boccardo-Dubey were amongst the group who popped in to see what all the buzz was about. While our Director John Spiak gave the group the “behind the scenes” tour, I remained at the front to greet and guide.

moore and king

aili

ceramics and glass far

rage bear full

Cumulus continues, and with the arrival of the centennial commemoration of the aqueduct, interest in this exhibition was noticeably heightened. The continuation of this show nicely complimented the three openings that occurred on Saturday. The first room people tended to make their way into was the space housing Aili Schmeltz’s Cross-Cut. Like many good works, this piece is better experienced than explained so nip that anticipation in the bud and come see it for yourself! Across from Schmeltz’s space is the fun and eclectic show Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome. Cal State University Fullerton MFA student Marvin Chow employed his curatorial talents and corralled his creative peers to create this visually stimulating show. Imagine a reality with bears instead of people and you have a glimpse into the world that Chow has created. There is something to Chow’s show that appeals to the young and old and everyone in between; it’s fun, energetic, and sometimes just plain weird. But I love it, and you can love it too, until February 9th. And of course, fall wouldn’t be complete without our Ceramics and Glass Exhibition and Sale, which includes incredible works by CSUF students, alumni and members of our community. It’s a great place to do a little holiday shopping.

Tim with crowd

ryman 1

tim typing

ryman 2

typewriters

This month GCAC was bursting at the seams with creative energy (I’m guessing it has something to do with that creative bug going around- see last month’s blog for details), so much so that it spilled into our hallways. Ryman Arts graced us with their presence and allowed our spacious abode to serve as one of the sites for their Big Draw L.A. event. The Big Draw allowed people of all ages to flex their creative muscle and see what the right side of their brain has to offer the world. At the other end of the hall artist Tim Youd parked his typewriter and went to work on Phillip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly. Youd takes novels and retypes them in the same location they were originally written, on the same make and model typewriter on which they were originally composed. Unfamiliar with his work? You’re in luck! He will be here at GCAC all month finishing his current project and recreations of his past projects will be hanging on our walls during this time.

john santa ana group

As the night was winding down and the excitement beginning to subside (or so I thought) the Mayor of Santa Ana Miguel Pulido, City Council Member Michele Martinez, new City Manager David Cavazos and other City Official casually waltz in the corridor! We here at GCAC are ecstatic that there is continued interest in our creative operations. This was further evident as I continuously caught our Artist in Residence, Vincent Goudreau nonchalantly hanging around the galleries. Goudreau is using his time with us to work on his heart-wrenching biographical account of a man whose father was murdered in front of him, on his fourteenth birthday. If you have a minute (and a tissue) listen to this firsthand account, HERE IS THE AUDIO LINK. Since our structure could barely stand anymore creative genius, it once again poured into the promenade and over to the Memphis at Santora. Some of CSUF’s MFA students such as Caesar Alzate and Teresita De La Torre livened up the space with their Day of the Dead themed art. It will be up all month if you missed it on Saturday and there will be a new show from the students up every month.

Vincent and Susan

So how was that? Are you still enjoying living vicariously through me or are you itching to get down here and experience it in person? I encourage the latter, especially since we just welcomed Susan Robb as Artist in Residence for her upcoming project/journey Wild Times. Plus, Goudreau is here through December, Cog-nate Collective (Amy Sanchez and Misael Diaz) are here in residence through next summer, and Tim continues to type in the lobby. Well Internet community, I do enjoy our little chats, it is an exciting thing for me to re-experience these events with you. If you happen to miss the Art Walk next month (which I hope you don’t), log on for December’s trip down memory lane. This is the GCAC intern, over and out.


INTERNal Affairs: Once Bitten

October 7, 2013

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

It’s spreading. Fast and unapologetic, the Creative bug is buzzing and has struck the arts community of Santa Ana. I’ve been on the front line here at Grand Central Art Center for just a few months now, but in that time I have seen artists turned mad with ingenuity and innovation, hardly able to contain their creative impulses; once the Creative bug bites the virus seems to run rampant through its host. After experiencing October’s first Saturday Art Walk, it has become abundantly clear that this outbreak has viciously begun to affect the arts community at large. The symptoms by which this virus manifests itself are as diverse and varied as the artists themselves. It is still unclear as to how this creativity spreads: is it contact? Is it airborne? Is it something in the water? Perhaps it’s some sort of contamination of the food? As you know, my Internet friends, I am no doctor; no, I am simply GCAC’s humble intern and your loyal reporter, so let’s take this time to review the evidence together and get to the bottom of this epidemic.

Eamonn1
(Eamonn Fox performing with Jenny)

I did my best to expect the unexpected during October’s Art Walk. I realize that this is the month of mischief and mayhem, so I kept an open mind and a watchful eye for anything out of the ordinary. This proved to be an arduous task; the last three months GCAC has happily facilitated artist Eamonn Fox, and for those of you who have experienced Fox and/or his work can sympathize when I say, it has become increasingly difficult to distinguish the ordinary from the extraordinary. I have somehow seemed to normalize absurdity and thusly am phased by very little. This speaks volumes to my bewilderment that was to occur on Saturday, but I’m getting ahead of myself, let’s start from the beginning.

beatriz1
(Beatriz Cortez with patron)

telethon 1
(The Eternal Telethon: The Power Suit Edition)

beatriz3
(Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine)

telethon 2
(The Eternal Telethon: The Power Suit Edition)

beatriz 2 w king
(Braden King viewing Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine)

So, it began like any other art walk, eager patrons strolling in to GCAC to get their last glimpse of Beatriz Cortez’s The Time Machine, and Eamonn Fox’s Solo Residency Exhibition for the Purposes of Furthering My Career, as well as to witness the unveiling of Cumulus, the newest installation in the main gallery by Matthew Moore and Braden King. Fox decided to take full advantage of his last art walk here with us by using his space to host The Eternal Telethon, a telethon for the 21st century organized by artist Jen Bruce, with Paul Michael White Jr., Niko Solorio, Alexis Disselkoen and Marcos de la Siref. Artists of varying talents took turns in front of the crowd and in front of the webcam (the telethon was streaming live on the internet), showcasing their skills for our enjoyment. This was the first indicator that the Creativity virus was spreading; artists from San Diego to Bakersfield turned out to plug in to this artistic outlet. There were musical acts, comedy routines, performance pieces, and two lively MCs that seamlessly supplemented the show. The inundation of artists and their passion for their craft indicated that they had not escaped the clutches of the Creative bug. Upon noticing this, my concern for the patrons grew. Not wanting to alarm anyone at a potential infestation of creativity here at GCAC, I carefully and quietly scanned the masses for signs of the Creativity bug. The crowd persisted through the Telethon in its entirety, excusing themselves occasionally to take their turn in The Time Machine or to gasp in awe at the enormously impressive Cumulus. All seemed well, until I saw it. I caught a glimpse of a patron’s eye and there it was, that glimmer of craze. I knew they had caught the bug; a sort of benign rabidity that propelled them through the galleries until their creative appetites were satisfied hastened their movements.

moore king 1
(Cumulus: Matthew Moore and Braden King)

memphis
(CSUF student exhibition at Memphis)

moore king 4
(Cumulus: Matthew Moore and Braden King)

The glow of the perfectly formatted projections on to the wooden reconstruction of the LA Aqueduct emanated from the gallery that houses Cumulus, or what King calls, “ 50 feet, 6,000 pounds, and18,000 lumens of awesome.” Feeling overwhelmed by the artistic greatness housed in GCAC and by the realization that the Creative virus is much bigger that I had initially suspected, I ran into the promenade for some fresh air, but that crazed look was in nearly everyone’s eyes! The vendors, the street performers, the passerby’s; in a dazed panic I stumbled towards the nearest illuminated room and found myself in the Memphis of Santora’s Backdoor Gallery. The modest gallery, donated by artist, curator and CSUF/GCAC MFA alum David Michael Lee, has become the new home to the works of some of Cal State University Fullerton’s students. Curator, featured artist, and GCAC MFA resident Caesar D. Alzate Jr. assured me that this was to be the first of many shows that would take place in the space. I was happy to meet our neighbors, but it only confirmed my fears that this Creative bug had spread past GCAC’s walls and was now beyond anyone’s control.

moore king detail
(Cumulus: Matthew Moore and Braden King)

tony 1
(Artist Tony de los Reyes)

group1
(Desiree and Greg Glenn, Jim Skuldt, Jesse Sugarmann and his wife Erica)

mules3
(Mary Leigh Cherry with her son and daughter, and artist Lauren Bon with one of her project’s promotional mules)

c4 1
(Artists Matthew Moore, Braden King, Micol Hebron, Carrie Marill, Jesse Sugarmann, Tony de los Reyes gather with program/projection system designer Brian Chasalow, Cherry and Martin gallery owner Mary Leigh Cherry, Filmmaker Alexa Sau, Sound Editor Borja Sau for post reception get together at C4)

My head spinning, I made my way back to GCAC where I ran into Matthew Moore and Braden King, who were both enjoying the opening of their remarkable installation, along with program/projection system designer Brian Chasalow and project assistant Kim Larkin. I knew that the Creative bug had bitten them all; it was abundantly evident in their work. Over the last month their condition never stabilized, it only intensified as the scope of their project seemed to abandon all boundaries until it eventually culminated into the fantastic creation that is Cumulus. It was then that I began to notice some familiar faces around the gallery and I realized then that I had been naïve to believe that the Creative epidemic had only been affecting Santa Ana. The return of Mary Leigh Cherry and Tony de los Reyes to the corridors of GCAC was a happy reunion after de los Reyes 2012 show in our gallery, but this also a red flag, the Creative bug was much more powerful than I anticipated. This was further confirmed when I noticed Creative Capital grantee artists, Jim Skuldt and Jesse Sugarmann bouncing between the galleries. King and Moore are also Creative Capital artists, so to have four under one roof was overwhelming to a young, impressionable intern such as myself. Artists Carrie Marill and Micol Hebron were roaming the spaces as well. The coup de gras, however, was when Lauren Bon parked her mules from her upcoming, 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct so that she could experience Cumulus, which stands as another homage to the centennial celebration of the LA Aqueduct. It was then that I came to a full realization that Creative bug cannot be contained; it’s indiscriminately hitting everyone and surfacing in the form of fantastically innovative works.

Aili1
(Aili Schmeltz: Cross Cut)

ragebear1
(Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome)

Tim Youd
(Tim Youd will be “Performing” A Scanner Darkly)

big draw
(Nov. 2, The Big Draw LA event at GCAC in collaboration with Ryman Arts)

vincent
(Vincent Goudreau – detail from The Juan Recordings: Migrating to the Senior Tour)

So that’s it Internet community, but I don’t know where this leaves us. After this recap of events, the only conclusion that I have reached is that no one is safe. I suppose my only advice is to enjoy it, because if you haven’t encountered the Creative bug yet, you soon will. Especially if you choose to join us on November 2nd for the first Saturday Art Walk when GCAC will continue Cumulus and open two new shows, Aili Schmeltz’s Cross Cut and Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome curated by MFA in Illustration student Marvin Chow. That evening will also mark the beginning of Tim Youd‘s month long “Performing” A Scanner Darkly and we’ll host a one night Big Draw LA event for the entire family with Ryman Arts throughout the evening. And did I mention, artist Vincent Goudreau arrives in residence this week from Maui and will be at GCAC for the next two months? Since contact with the Creative bug is inevitable, I suggest you welcome it with open arms and join us sooner rather than later here at GCAC. I hope that you come to your senses and embrace the madness because if you can’t beat them, join them. This is the GCAC intern, over and out.


INTERNal Affairs: Guitar Fights and Neon Tights

September 17, 2013

INTERNal Affairs is a new series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

three performance panarama(Multiple Possessions performance)

Did you see that guy getting chased by a guitar-wielding musician? How about those three gentlemen who striped down to neon tights? Did the musical melodies of LYSOL pierce your eardrums and shake your entire being? No? Well then you must have missed September’s Art Walk! Shame on you for ignoring my last blog! I told you, Grand Central Art Center is a hotbed of experimental and exciting artistic collaboration, and it should not be missed! Those who attended can attest to that and are fully aware that words hardly convey the events of that evening. However, as your faithful reporter I will do my best to recreate the happenings of that thrilling Saturday as they occurred to me, GCAC’s dutiful intern.

b looking through cracks































(patrons view The Time Machine)

September resumes the shows from August’s opening of Beatriz Cortez’s, The Time Machine and Eamonn Fox’s, Solo Residency for the Purposes of Furthering My Career; the artists rose to the challenge of keeping their pieces stimulating and engaging. Cortez obliged inquisitive minds by remaining in her exhibition space for the duration of the evening, offering insight and guided tours to any and all who were willing to venture on her artistic journey. Fox fulfilled his objective of involving the public in art by completely submerging them in three jaw-dropping performance pieces.

three performance beginning(Multiple Possessions performance)

three performance in middle(Multiple Possessions performance)

tights end of performance(Multiple Possessions performance)

Fox welcomed back fellow artist Patrick Ballard, as well as Nathan Bockelman and Brian Getnick, in the evening’s first performance, Multiple Possessions. Ballard (the Cyclops conjuring, blue mouthed, Mozart of the synthesizer that performed during August’s Art Walk) joined Bockelman and Getnick in dropping their drawers and drawing a crowd. If you were lucky enough to have been present, you’ll remember me as the door monitor warning all that the show contained “adult content.” The three wandered about the stage area boasting sheer neon tights (complete with newspaper for censorship), looking confused and muted as though they were trapped in a bubble in which the audience could not understand them and they could not be heard. After the artist’s wandered the stage, they each took a place behind a microphone and began chanting one word each until they reached a unified, melodic tune. The tune stopped and the center performer picked up a guitar and proceeded to never play. After a brief silence, a glow of normalcy returned to the artists’ faces and with that, the performance concluded. As a uniformed audience member, (I didn’t discuss the project with the artists) I took the performance to be a commentary on the general public’s reception of art. Certain works may not fulfill the expectations of the creator nor the observer and while artists do create with meaning, there is not a wrong way to interpret art; it is as unique as the person experiencing it.

b waiting in green shirt































(patrons view The Time Machine)

b waiting from lobby































(patrons view The Time Machine)

b viewing video


















(patrons view The Time Machine)

This idea seemed to travel through the halls of GCAC; as I stood in the foyer with my handy-dandy clicker counter, I could hear Beatriz Cortez asking what feelings her Time Machine evoked in those individuals emerging from the wooden box. She loved hearing the range of responses and when asked what it was supposed to mean, she simply responded with her view, but noted that it is something different for everyone. Meanwhile Fox was setting up his personal performance in the promenade.

eamonn performance(Emoticons performance)

Fox’s passion for actively involving the public in art led to a performance titled, Emoticons, which flung creativity and originality in the faces of the audience. A Santa Ana local who has certainly built up his frequent flyer miles here at GCAC shared with me his thoughts on Fox; he feels that Fox is indeed a true artist because true artists, “cut through the bulls*@t.” Eamonn Fox is certainly free of Buls*@t. He is sarcastic and ironic in all the right ways, while maintaining a consistent and blatant honesty in all that he does. Art is a creative expression of the thoughts and feelings of the creator, and Fox, with a band behind him and a microphone in hand, creatively expressed his thoughts and feelings to the entire promenade. The performance concluded with the guitarist chasing Fox into the gallery with his instrument drawn over his head like a battle-axe.

l2(LYSOL performance)

l1(LYSOL performance)

The final performance was once again in Fox’s gallery space and consisted of a live performance of the piercing sounds of the band LYSOL. It is difficult to place the band within a genre, but I would say it was a 50-50 blend of singing and screaming. Bravo to LYSOL for maintain energy and keeping their vocal chords intact. It was a wonderful opportunity for GCAC’s patrons, as well as myself, to fully appreciate the acoustics of our building; if you were ever curious as to how well sound carries through our corridors, the answer is very well. In fact, I would venture to say that in some parts of the building sound is even amplified. At this point in the evening I was that girl in the bowler’s cap in the lobby shouting greetings at newcomers as they entered, my need to greet and welcome could not be deterred by the overpowering sounds of a band who’s amps reach 11.

matthew moore braden king proposal(Matthew Moore and Braden King: Cumulus – installation proposal image)

adriana installation(patrons viewing Nothing Else Left)

Alright art world of the Internet, have you learned your lesson? I sure hope so, October’s Art Walk will be THE LAST time to see both Cortez’s and Fox’s work here at GCAC. We will also have a brand new show, Cumulus in the main gallery. This work is a collaborative effort of Matthew Moore and Braden King and it is going to be quite a display. This means if you have yet to see our current main gallery exhibition, Nothing Else Left by Adriana Salazar, get down here now! Her show ends Sunday, September 22. So please, I beg of you, do not make the same mistake twice. Come refine that creative palate here at Grand Central Art Center and be a part of history in the making. I certainly will be here, clicker in hand, waiting for you. This is the GCAC intern, over and out.


GCAC Intern Off to Grad School @ School of the Art Institute Chicago!

May 11, 2013

In the words of GCAC intern Ariel Gentalen as she completes her internship and heads to Chicago for grad school…

ariel pic

The first word that comes to mind while reflecting on my year as an intern at Grand Central Art Center is community. It is John Spiak’s unflinching commitment to partnerships and involvement that created a beneficial learning environment to expand my understanding of the inner workings of the art world. I was also fortunate to be working with the supportive and welcoming staff that makes Grand Central such a lovely place to be on a day-to-day basis.

My time at Grand Central began after a last minute, and insane, road trip to Portland, OR to attend Open Engagement 2012 conference. It was ultimately an adventure that developed into one of the most important experiences of my undergraduate career. I say adventure, because CSUF Professor Gretchen Potts drove myself and two other art students 16 hours in a rented Prius, to attend. At the time it didn’t seem like a flawed plan, but upon our arrival, as we sat across from each other at lunch as speechless zombies from exhaustion, we realized flying there might have been easier. After a quick nap, we attended panel discussions focused on integrating social practice into museums, outlining successful education programs in museums and galleries, as well as creating alternative spaces for creativity where established institutions have none. I met and conversed with individuals who were responsible for creating dynamic public programming and working directly with communities. These meetings helped me conclude that this must be my career path, not only to fulfill my own passions, but also to guide others in a similar fashion. Connecting with John at the conference and seeing him speak on the “It Turns our There is Room for Everyone: Museums and Social Practice” panel, I knew that I wanted to work with someone so devoted to the tide of Social Practice art and how it benefits surrounding communities. One week after the conference, I began my GCAC internship.

Over the course of the summer and the following year, I was lucky enough to work with an amazing list of artists in residence, assisting in the realization of projects – from contacting surrounding Santa Ana organizations trying to recruit baseball players for Adam Moser’s MLB project; to sitting on the floor of the AIR apartment with Lisa Bielawa conversing about art and music culture in Orange County; to sharing mouthwatering arepa cooked by current GCAC Project Room exhibiting artist Saskia Jorda. As an Art History major, you spend the majority of your time studying flashcards, reading verbose art theory and attempting to comprehend what the omnipresent art world is – and how you eventually want to fit into it. It is a testament to the power of informal learning experiences – being a fly on the wall during meetings or grant writing discussions –which provided the opportunity for a demystification of what it means to operate in the art world. Grand Central also connected me to Project Access, through an opportunity to produce and run a workshop in partnership with their teen program hosted at Santa Ana Community College. Throughout my year here, there has been nothing but support, whether it comes in the form of pitch meetings for public programming. allowing for time off during grad school application panic, or other on campus leadership duties. It has been a truly rewarding and informative year in how to operate as an advocate of the arts.

Next week, I will be flying (we learned our lesson – no more road trips) out to Portland with fellow student and friend Karla Monterrey to attend Open Engagement once again. It may be painfully cliché, but I embrace the cyclical journey this past year at Grand Central has provided me. I am so excited to be critically engaged for three days of intense art focused discussion, this time with a well-rested and attentive brain. Karla and I are committed to taking and applying all of the conversations at Open Engagement with us to graduate school at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. It is my hope to engage communities the way John and the Grand Central Art Center has done with CSUF and Santa Ana, as well as nurture a future generation of critical citizens.

Ariel Gentalen
CSUF, BA in Art History, Minor in Women’s Studies, ‘13