Pakistan Independence Day Celebration & Dutch Treat Dinner (Aug. 14) – 59 Days of Independence Project @ Grand Central Art Center

August 7, 2014

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Earlier this year, Heather Layton and Brian Bailey joined us as artists in residence, here to realize programs through their current project 59 Days of Independence. Throughout 2014, a vast network of artists, musicians, dancers, authors, filmmakers and community members from around the globe are celebrating the independence days of 59 countries that once gained freedom from British rule. The most important part of the project is that they are all celebrating for countries OTHER than their own. In January, they celebrated Burma’s 66th independence day on JANUARY 4TH at GCAC by giving away 66 hand-painted lanterns.

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PAKISTAN INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION @ 2PM, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14TH

This week Heather and Brian return as GCAC artists in residence, developing a project celebrating Pakistan’s 67th independence day on AUGUST 14th, with a “Malala Trilingual Book Reading for Kids”. The celebration will include a trilingual reading of three selected picture books (approx. ages 4-8). The 1st and 3rd will teach about aspects of Pakistani-American culture and the 2nd will teach about aspects of Mexican-American culture. The books will be read in Spanish, Urdu and English with projections of the illustrations on the wall. We will transform the room into a colorful and intriguing space reflecting Pakistan’s rich visual culture. There will be a food table with small samplings from a local Pakistani restaurant. Also onsite will be an assortment of craft objects that show the development of Pakistani visual culture from traditional to contemporary. Funding in support of this GCAC residency is provided by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

In January, during the First Saturday Art Walk, Heather and Brian met and began a conversation with Orange County School for the Arts student Miguel Pulido (now an alum of OCSA, Class of 2014). Miguel was excited about their project and they began a dialogue about collaboration toward this current project. Miguel was instrumental in the development of this program and is connecting the project with additional students and alum of OCSA to get them involved, including Monica Mouet and Pam Solorzano who assisted with the early development.

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Through these collaborative efforts a relationship was established with the Irvine Pakistani Parents’ Association, through its members Ifra Khoso, Sheba Akhtar, Almas Asif, Farhan Aziz and Anila Ali, who are actively collaborating on the program of celebration on August 14th here at Grand Central Art Center.

DUTCH TREAT DINNER @ 7PM, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14TH
@ THE ROBBINS NEST WINE BAR

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The event will be followed that evening by a GCAC DUTCH TREAT DINNER, beginning 7pm at The Robbins Nest Wine Bar here in Downtown Santa Ana, 207 West 2nd Street. The artists and many of their collaborators will be at the event to connect further with those in attendance. DUTCH TREAT DINNER are an opportunity to build new connections, reconnect with those you know and develop a stronger community of creative individuals. Unlike a gala or formal dinner event, DTD has no set menu, ticket price or seating arrangement – you order straight from the standard menu, attend for free and sit with those you wish. Individuals attending are responsible for their own dinner bill, hence the name DUTCH TREAT DINNER. There is no pressure – you eat and drink what you order and can afford.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO HAVING YOU JOIN US IN CELEBRATION!

Here are the details on the program…

Malala Yousafzai ke baray mein kutub Beeni,
Bachon ke liye teen zabano mein

Thursday, August 14, 2:00pm
Grand Central Art Center
125 N. Broadway, Santa Ana

Un evento que celebra el dia de independencia de Pakistan con música, comida y una lectura a voz alta trilingüe de libros infantiles cuales demuestran la belleza de la diversidad cultural. / A free event that celebrates Pakistan’s independence day with music, food, and a trilingual reading of three picture books that demonstrate the beauty of cultural diversity.

Daaqula muft aura am hae / Gratis e Abierto Al Publico.

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INTERNal Affairs: The Writing on the Wall (Banksy Talk Review)

February 18, 2014

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

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What is art? Is it hanging in a gallery? Is it made in a studio by hands that are finely tuned and well trained? Should it depict beauty? Should it represent an idea? Every generation conventionalizes a standard of “art” based on a definition ultimately defined by the critic. It has become the artist’s role to first establish these norms then defy them. Outspoken, cheeky, and veiled, the graffiti artist Banksy stands at the forefront of the contemporary fight for unconventional art. The British based street artist spent last October in New York during a “residency” in which he installed a new work each day. His imposition in the self-proclaimed art capital of America earned Banksy the scorn and smite from many of the city’s most reputable critics. However, artist, critic, and contributing editor to Art In America, Carol Diehl puts her well-earned reputation on the line to not only disagree with her colleagues, but to publically defend Banksy’s philosophy. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of Grand Central Art Center’s John Spiak along with Cal State Fullerton’s Chair of Visual Art Jade Jewett and Professor Joanna Roche, the main campus hosted the public debut of Diehl’s insights into the man who is the masked satirist. If you had the extreme misfortune of missing this talk, fret no longer! As always, you can experience it through me, your GCAC intern.

From blogs to print, during his “residency,” Banksy was reviled as what New York based critic Jerry Saltz calls, “amazingly unoriginal.” But was originality really his objective? Diehl identifies Banksy’s themes as a compilation of anti’s: anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism, anti-greed, and anti-war.  With such motives Banksy’s end goal isn’t ingenuity, it’s awareness­­­­­­­­— he offers a new perspective on the status quo. Diehl went on to highlight the deeply humanistic qualities of Banksy’s work, supporting her observations with the fact that his work “vilifies no one.” Diehl chalks up his disdain amongst critics to the sad fact that we exist in a “culture that’s constantly pitting one side against another,” inspiring a legitimate confusion when we encounter an attitude that blames no one specifically.

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Diehl was careful not to disregard Banksy as the crude prankster that he is often made out to be. He is an artist with a message. His medium and surfaces are chosen concurrently with his ideals. Banksy is speaking out against the passive acceptance of a defined convention; he has to reach those who exist beyond the exclusivity of the tightly woven art world. Revolutions don’t happen from high rises, they happen in the streets. Thus, Banksy rids his work of pretense by using graffiti as his medium and existing utilitarian surfaces as his canvases.  He mocks the capitalist establishment while reaching his intended audience—everyone. He has taken his work out of the gallery and delivered it directly to the people.  I especially appreciated Diehl’s realization that graffiti is an illegal activity and as such, Banksy is literally risking his life to reach the public at large.

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So what is art? Well I suppose that it is ultimately up to the viewers to decide, whether that be an experienced critic or an observant passer-by. Through the in-depth analysis provided by Carol Diehl, this intern is convinced that Banksy is not only an artist, but one of the great artists of our time. Intelligent and provoking, Banksy’s work must be experienced in its entirety. It is not just the image we see painted on a wall that demands contemplation, but the message deeply plaited within. He speaks a language understood by all and strips us of our differences; his work can be absurd because human beings are absurd, it can provoke laughter because we are all capable of humor, it questions normalcy because that is something that should be decided by the individual, not the committee. With a little help from Diehl and other Banksy advocates in the field, perhaps he will not be misunderstood much longer.

Well that’s my two-cents. If you missed the talk with Carol Diehl, this blog certainly does not do it justice. Hopefully we will be hearing more from Carol and with any luck her lecture will surface again soon. This is your GCAC intern, over and out.



BANKSY: COMPLETED – Feb 13 @ 7PM with Carol Diehl – CSUF Main Campus

February 3, 2014

BANKSY: COMPLETED

Carol Diehl
Art in America, Contributing Editor

FEBRUARY 13, 7PM
California State University, Fullerton
MAIN CAMPUS
Lecture Hall – VA 113
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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Each day last October, the British street artist known as Banksy left his mark on New York City, hitting all five boroughs in a self-styled “residency” that included paintings on walls, roving theme trucks, videos on his website, sculptures and more—leaving fans delighted and critics enraged. Artist and art critic Carol Diehl follows Banksy’s clues to explore the overarching philosophies that drive this prankster, who calls himself a “good vandal.”

Among the galleries and museum where Diehl has exhibited her work, are the Sidney Janis Gallery, Hirschl & Adler Modern, and Gary Snyder Fine Art, the Queens Museum of Art, the Aldrich Museum and, in 2012, the Berkshire Museum in Massachusetts. She is the recipient of artists’ fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the New York Foundation for the Arts.

A Contributing Editor to Art in America, Diehl has written cover stories on Robert Irwin, Olafur Eliasson, Christian Marclay and Wolfgang Laib. Her writing has also been published in, among others, ARTnews, Art & Auction, and New York Magazine. In 2012 she received a fellowship from the Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation for her blog, Art Vent.

Diehl has served on the faculties of Bennington College (VT) and the Graduate Fine Arts Program of the School of Visual Arts (NYC). She lives in New York City and Southwestern Massachusetts.

Presented by Grand Central Art Center
A Unit of CSUF, College of the Arts