ARTIST TALK: Flora Kao – Wind House, Abode That A Breath Effaced (8/2 @ 6PM) – GCAC

July 23, 2014

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Please join us on Saturday, August 2nd at 6:00PM for a conversation with Flora Kao. The artist will be discussing her work and her current installation in the Grand Central Art Center Project Room – Wind House, Abode That A Breath Effaced.


Workshop (3/17) & Update on Artist in Residence Saskia Jorda’s Unraveling Tradition

March 15, 2013

Grand Central Art Center Artist in Residence Saskia Jorda and her artistic collaborator, California State University at Fullerton visual art student Angelica Perez-Aguirre, invite you to join them at GCAC this Sunday, March 17th from 2-4pm, for a hands-on workshop in the development of the project Unraveling Tradition.

With the intention of bringing about a broader understanding of the Quinceañera tradition, they invite you to share your story and hear those of others.

Complete details for the workshop can be found below, but we wanted to first provide you a little update on the activities related to Saskia’s residency and the overall project – which will result in a full installation at GCAC scheduled to open with a major reception on May 4th from 7-10pm.

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During the Downtown Santa Ana March First Saturday, Saskia and Angelica were joined by Quinceañera magazines January-April issue Cover Girl Jennifer Razo and the issues Miss Popular Sabrina Torres. The Artist in Residence studio was opened to our GCAC 2nd Street Promenade, inviting the public to join them in conversation, hands-on activities and a magazine signing by their two celebrity guests.  Thank you to Quinceañera magazines for their continued support of this project!

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The following afternoon, March 3rd, Saskia and Angelica presented their first public workshop.  They were joined by members of our community who brought their own personal stories, histories and future plans associated with the tradition Quinceañera, sharing a wonderful afternoon of conversation.  While everyone talked, they engaged in hand making activities involving fabrics, buttons and photographs.  Much was shared to inform the project and help in the development of the workshop scheduled for this Sunday.

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Since that first workshop, Saskia and Angelica have been hard at work in the Artist in Residence studio.  Saskia has been developing, with the assistance of our amazing preparatory Matthew Miller, the overall plans for the spinning sculptural element which will be presented in the GCAC Project Gallery this May.  The two artists have also been busy sewing fabric elements.  To date they have gathered and ruffled over 160 yards, with a goal of over 500 yards when the project is complete.

Our entire GCAC team is excited to see the outcome of this project in May and we invite you to join us that evening, which we promise will hold many surprises!

So come be a part of the project and join Saskia and Angelica for this Sunday’s workshop at Grand Central Art Center’s Artist in Residence Studio!

Here are the workshop details:

Workshop: March 17, 2-4 pm

Explore the Quinceañera traditionby sharing your story with us

Join artists Saskia Jordá and Angelica Perez-Aguirre at Grand Central Art Center in Santa Ana for a project entitled “Quinceañera.”

With the intention of bringing about a broader understanding of the Quinceañera tradition, we invite you to share your story and hear those of others. If you are a:
- Quinceañera who is preparing for your special day.
- Young girl or woman who has already gone through this celebration.
- Parent, relative, or friend interested in sharing your own experience.
Or, join us if you are simply interested in learning about this long-standing tradition.

Come and take part in the “Recuerdos” or “memory” making day.
- Share your photos and experiences and listen to those of others.
- Transform your Quinceañera dress or any item from your celebration into wearable art objects or “Recuerdos.”
- Or come and share your excitement and ideas, and work with our materials.

A series of free workshops on:
 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 from 2-4 PM 
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 from 2-4 PM 
GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER, A.I.R Studio
125 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, CA
Drop in or let us know if you can join us by calling us at: (714) 567-7233
For more info visit: https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/

Explore la tradición de Quinceañera compartiendo su historia con nosotros

Acompañe a las artistas Saskia Jordá y Angelica Perez-Aguirre en Grand Central Art Center en Santa Ana para un proyecto titulado “Descifrando una Tradición”.
Le invitamos a compartir su historia y escuchar las de otros, con la intención de lograr una comprensión más amplia de la tradición de la Quinceañera. Si Ud. es:
- Una Quinceañera que se prepara para su día especial
- Una joven o mujer que ya ha pasado por esta celebración
- Familiar o amigo interesado en compartir su propia experiencia
- O simplemente acompáñenos si está interesado/a en aprender más sobre esta tradición.

Venga y participe en un día de crear “Recuerdos”.

– Comparta sus fotos y experiencias y escuche las de otros.
- Transforme su vestido de Quinceañera o cualquier artículo de su celebración en objetos de arte usables o “Recuerdos”.
- O venga y comparta su entusiasmo e ideas y trabaje con nuestros materiales.

Una serie de talleres gratuitos el:

DOMINGO, 3 DE MARZO, 2013 from 2-4 PM
DOMINGO, 17 DE MARZO, 2013 from 2-4 PM

GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER, A.I.R Studio
125 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, CA
Preséntese o avísenos si nos puede acompañar llamándonos al: (714) 567-7233
Para más información visite: https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/


2012-2013 EXHIBITION / PROGRAM SCHEDULE @ Grand Central Art Center

August 8, 2012

EXHIBITIONS / ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE / PUBLIC PROGRAMS / THEATRE & DANCE
2012-2013 SCHEDULE
GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER
A Unit of California State University, Fullerton
College of the Arts
125 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, CA 92701 – t. 714.567.7233
w. http://www.grandcentralartcenter.com
b. http://www.grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com

GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER MISSION STATEMENT
Grand Central Art Center is dedicated to the investigation and engagement of contemporary art and visual culture – regionally, nationally and internationally – through unique collaborations between artists, students and the community.

SUPPORT
Grand Central Art Center programs would not be possible without the generous support provided by:
William Gillespie Foundation
Fainbarg-Chase Families
anonymous donor
community collaborative partners

PRESEASON OPENING PERFORMANCE
Friday, August 24 at 7 p.m.

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich, with sound performance by Steve Roden and Glenn Bach
Friday, August 24, 7 p.m.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNWkdbBf5Ls
In his spectacle-installation Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich returns to a theme originally explored in Bleu Provisoire (2001), a spectacle in which a mysterious blue liquid oozes through the layers of his skin as though it were the final effect or by-product of his body’s inner processes. In Bleu Remix, the artist once more invites the viewer to experience an intimate journey through the corners of his body. Each time the spectacle is performed, a different (local) musician accompanies Marussich. This unique, singular confrontation establishes a new relationship between the sound and image. The meeting of the two artists brings an element of risk and uniqueness to the event, as if the music explores the spectacle repeatedly, resulting in new ways of perception. 
Marussich’s spectacle-installation at Grand Central Art Center will be accompanied by live sound performed by artists Steve Roden and Glenn Bach.

This program is in collaboration with LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions), with support for Bleu Remix at both venues generously provided by swissnex San Francisco, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, and the City and Canton of Geneva.

SEASON OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, September 1 from 7-10 p.m.

Tony de los Reyes: Border Theory
September 1 through November 14, 2012
The Border Theory paintings combine two “orders” – abstract painting and the border that separates Mexico and the United States. Their relationship concerns components that are inherent in each: the demarcation of space through a conceptual framework, and its resulting material manifestation. Both systems rely on a combination of organic and inorganic materials and processes. The border itself can be addressed as site of politicized abstraction. It also utilizes specific materials and processes to organize otherwise incoherent space.  The Rio Grande, a geological, natural boundary that dominates the eastern portion of the border, turns abruptly into a geometric bifurcation on the western half of the border. This push and pull of “landscape” and “border,” which is inherent in topographical mapping, also happens to be the most significant occupation of abstract painting.  This solo exhibition will mark the premiere of de los Reyes new body of work.

Constantin Hartenstein: Event Horizon
September 1 through October 14, 2012
Grand Central Art Center Artist in Residence, Constantin Hartenstein (b. 1982, Herzberg, former GDR), is an installation and video artist living and working in Berlin and New York. His works deal with personalized appearances of spaces within the context of displacement, settlement and fast forward consumer culture.  During his residency, Hartenstein will create new work that will be presented in a solo exhibition.

Erin Morrison: Meditative Action
September 1 through October 14, 2012
Morrison’s recent body of work is a culmination of paintings ranging from what some might consider surrealistic landscape to magic realism, with slight experimentation in minimalism. The intent of the work is to reach beyond the dictum of paintings history through the categorization of genre, and to explore the identifiable borders established by the institution of studio practice. They portray a sense of loss or misunderstanding, as well as a feeling of upheaval, revealing the displacement that comes with living a somewhat nomadic life.

CSUF Students Ceramic and Glass Exhibition and Sale
November 3 through January 14, 2013
This year’s annual ceramics and glass exhibition and sale focuses on the work of students from California State University, Fullerton.  The exhibition will be organized through the collaborative efforts of CSUF School of Art Associate Professor Nobuhito (Nobu) Nishigawara.

Sean C. Flaherty: An Overture in Parts
November 3, 2012 through January 14, 2013
Through a three act video installation, appropriating the soundtrack of the Broadway musical Les Misérables (based upon the 1862 French novel by author Victor Hugo), artist Sean C. Flaherty explores complex family and relationship dynamics.   The installation includes the video works: Act I, The Confrontation: Script as Set; Act II, One Day More: A Family in Parts; Act III, A Heart Full of Love: Familiar Parts.  Flaherty’s work allows the personal to become universal, providing seemingly intimate and private shared matters to be opened to critique.

Brent Green: To Many Men Strange Fates Are Given
December 1 through February 10, 2013
Brent Green is a self-taught artist and filmmaker who lives and works in a barn in Cressona, PA.  Known for his poetic works that address complex personal struggles, the artist will be in residence in the fall of 2012, creating a new multi-channel video installation for solo exhibition in the main gallery.  Green will conduct outreach programs with teens of the Santa Ana community, through animation and stop-motion filmmaking techniques, helping youth in the development of original content. His time at Grand Central Art Center will also include a screening (date TBA) with live soundtrack, performed by Brent Green and his selected musicians, of his past animation works.

Grand Central Art Center MFA Residents Exhibition
February 2 through April 21, 2013
The MFA Residents Exhibition will feature work by the artists currently residing at Grand Central Art Center.  The GCAC houses 28 residential apartments on its privately secured second floor, 26 of the apartments are dedicated living spaces for students of California State University Fullerton’s College of the Arts MFA program.  The Center also includes active studio space for each of the artists.

Monique Leyton and Brad Kuhl: Elite Deviance
March 2 through May 12, 2013
Kuhl & Leyton’s collaborative work explores the American and global culture of crime and its relationship to fame, media and the bizarre. The solo exhibition at Grand Central Art Center marks the US premiere of their new body of work, which focuses on the subject of white-collar crimes.  The artists draw inspiration from both obscure and popular subjects in the news, on the Internet and television.  Their primary medium is tape on paper.

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE SCHEDULE:

Constantin Hartenstein
http://www.constantinhartenstein.com/
through mid-September 2012
Working with members of the community to explore the concept of “future” through the exploration of Southern California futurist architecture. During his residency, Hartenstein will also create an installation, through the collaborative work with community, which will premiere in the GCAC project gallery.

Jules Rochielle
http://www.julesrochielle.com/
Pop in visits through November, full time late-November through late-December 2012
Rochielle was first in residence at GCAC in spring 2012 and has been returning throughout the summer for pop in visits.  She is continuing to expand on the relationships she has built in the community and developing collaborative projects which include:  An oral histories project that deals with recording of stories of the survivors of violence, centered around a neighborhood known as the Townsend district in Santa Ana, through a collaboration with the Santa Ana Public Library Teen Space program “young historians” and Sharon Sekhon PhD, Professor, CSUF American Studies; Working on a proposal to develop a public work of art in the Logan Neighborhood through collaboration/conversations with the local organizations Santa Ana Public Library, United Artists of Santa Ana, El Centro, SACReD and The Grain Project; Organizing a teen summit and future GCAC teen council through relationships being built with Santa Ana Public Library, Santa Ana Boys and Girls Club, Bowers Museum, Project Access Warwick Center, Santa Ana High School and Orange County School for the Arts.

Brent Green
http://site.nervousfilms.com/
mid-September through early-December 2012
Outreach programs focused on the creation of stop-motion animated film/video works.  Green will also screen his past animation work with live performed soundtrack for a one evening program in collaboration with The Copper Door, Santa Ana.  During his residency, he will also create a full video installation that will premiere in the GCAC main gallery.

Carmen Papalia
http://www.gallerieswest.ca/events/madness-and-mobilty-the-art-of-inclusion/
mid-October 2012 (first visit), Additional Extended Visit TBA
First visit will include a welcoming performance/city tour.  Upon immediate arrival, Papalia, who is visually impaired, will lead individuals on a walking tour of downtown Santa Ana. A full marching band will follow the artist and will begin to play music whenever the artist approaches a potential hazard.  The work is an attempt to create a heightened awareness of ones own community and surroundings.  Papalia will spend time developing a future project that will be realized through a future extended residency at GCAC.

MKE<–>LAX: Sarah Gail Luther
http://www.mke-lax.org and http://sarahluther.blogspot.com/
mid-November 2012 
Born in Milwaukee, Sarah is devoted to creating work that expands her knowledge of specific cities.  She’s worked with IN:SITE, a Milwaukee-based temporary public art organization, for three years.  She has been involved with public art projects including The Amplifier, a pop-up community center located in Milwaukee’s Silver City neighborhood, which was funded by the Wisconsin Arts Board.

This residency is in collaboration with the CSUF Begovich Gallery exhibition Interstice (November 10 – December 13, 2012), curated by CSUF Exhibition Design graduate students Cassandra Erb and Kimberly McKinnis, in association with MKE<–>LAX through the direction of Sara Daleiden.

Heather Layton and Brian Bailey
http://www.heatherlayton.com/_/intervention.html
late-December 2012 through late-January 2013
Backpack Film School will engage the local youth community, allowing individuals to explore the histories, traditions and transitions of downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods. Through the expertise of the artists, the participating youth will develop skills and knowledge of filmmaking, working with the artists and community to create a series of visionary film projects. When completed, the films will be screened through a series of unique community film festivals in the exact neighborhoods in which the participating filmmakers live.  Each teen filmmaker will be responsible for deciding their location – apartment complex, driveway, school, public street and/or local parking lot – for their individual festival. The youth create the vision, invitation and serve as the director for their individual festival, responsible for introductions and remarks to open their festival. GCAC will provide all the projection, screen and sound equipment, as well as set-up and support needed for each festival. The artists and GCAC team will remain behind the scenes for each event, allowing the participating filmmaker to take the leadership role.

Saskia Jorda
http://saskiajorda.com/
late-January through late-April 2013
Quinceañeras is a residency exploring bodies in state of transition, from childhood into womanhood, based upon the artist’s own experience and memories of becoming a quinceañeras in Venezuela (one of the artist’s last significant experiences before migrating to the U.S). The artist plans to collaborate with 29 quinceañeras/wedding shops located in Downtown Santa Ana, Quinceañera Magazine, a downtown non-profit health care provider and individuals of the community – which will include girls and their families as they prepare for quinceañeras. Working together, they will examine the traditions behind rite of passage, family values and body image as perceived by these teenagers.

Bad at Sports
http://badatsports.com/
May – July 2013
Bad at Sports is a Chicago-based artist collective that began as a solution to the problem of dwindling local arts coverage. The results so far have included: a weekly podcast/freely accessible audio archive of 380+ hours of artists and “art worlders” talking about their “art” and their “world;” several exhibitions and events; and a blog, that in 2000+ articles, has not only shed light on the regional art context, but offers an international reach and engagement. The project reflects the logic and generosity of the Internet – engaging, inviting and openly participating in the discussions that shape our culture.

Holly Myers: What is Art Worth? – Conversations About Value in Contemporary Art
http://thenand.org/
Date: TBA
What is art worth? Is a multi-dimensional research based project that aims to explore and interrogate the concept of value in relation to the visual arts. How is value determined in the art world? How do we talk about value? What are the different kinds of value and how do we understand the relationship between them? How is value generated? Who generates it? How is it utilized? How is it distributed? Whom does it benefit?

PROJECTS/RESIDENCIES IN DEVELOPMENT:

Paul Ramirez Jonas
http://www.paulramirezjonas.com/

Lisa Bielawa
http://www.lisabielawa.com/

Vincent Goudreau
http://www.vincentgoudreau.com/

PUBLIC PROGRAM SERIES:

Patchwork: Indie Arts and Craft Festival
http://www.patchworkshow.com/
November 25, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Peruse 100+ booths featuring local independent
artists, designers & crafters at the show. These amazing creators
will be showcasing their wares including: clothing for men, women
& kids, accessories, home goods like art, pottery & glassware,
pet items, jewelry, soaps, candles & other bath & body items,
craft kits & patterns, knit & crochet items, stationery & paper
goods, plushies, purses, handbags and so much more!  Patchwork is organized by our GCAC tenant/collaborative partner The Road Less Traveled.

MFA Conversations
Dates: TBA
Grand Central Art Center is developing a series of conversations that will take place at GCAC.  Placing CSUF MFA students working on degrees in specific medium, in conversation with individuals currently successful in that medium, in conversation with individuals who play a role in decision-making within that field.  For example:  MFA artist, in conversation with a successful artist in the field, in conversation with a gallery owner; or MFA theatre student, in conversation with actor, in conversation with theatre director/TV show creator; exhibition/design student, in conversation with curator, in conversation with museum director.  The MFA student, who can use the conversation to ask questions focused toward approaches for their greater success and opportunities in the field as they near and complete graduation, will lead these public programs.

Brilliant Soil – Film Screening in collaboration with bulbo, OC Film Fiesta and The Yost
http://www.brilliantsoil.org/
Dates: September 16, 1 p.m. @ The Yost
This documentary follows Herlinda, an indigenous Purepecha potter, one of the few artisans in her community who uses alternative lead-free glazes, as she faces the difficult task of finding a market for her impressive pieces. The screening is presented in collaboration with bulbo (Tijuana/Los Angeles), OC Film Fiesta and The Yost Theatre.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS IN DEVELOPMENT:

GCAC is working to secure funding for a series tentatively titled “Santa Ana Sites.”  These programs will include professional performance based events – including dance, theatre and opera – that will occur at sites throughout downtown Santa Ana.

GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER THEATRE SCHEDULE:
Programmed by California State University, Fullerton
Department of Theatre & Dance

Ordinary Days
Music & Lyrics by Adam Gwon
Directed by Patrick Pearson
Oct. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20 @ 8 p.m.
[a refreshingly honest and funny musical about making real connections in the jungle of New York City]

A Bright New Boise
by Stephan D. Hunter
Directed by Mark Ramont
Oct. 26, 27, Nov. 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10 @ 8 p.m.
[Summoning the Rapture, this comedy will shatter preconceptions about the sacred, the profane and the secret lives of big box retailers]

The Drunken City
by Adam Bock
Nov. 16, 29, 30, Dec. 1, 5, 6, 7, 8 @ 8 p.m., Nov. 17 @ 2pm
[A wildly theatrical take on the mystique of marriage and the ever-shifting nature of love and identity in a city that never sleeps]

CSUF Spring 12 x 16 Dance
Coordinated by William F. Lett
Mar. 7, 8, 9 @ 8 p.m., Mar. 9 @ 2pm
Spring Show #1 – TBA
Mar. 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30 @ 8 p.m.

Spring Show #2 – TBA
Apr. 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27 @ 8 p.m.

TBA MFA/NEW PLAY
Directed by Jeremy Lewis
May 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18 @ 8 p.m.

CSUF Spring Cabarets
Coordinated by Mitchell Hanlon
May 21, 22, 23, 24 @ 7 & 9 p.m.

* Additional exhibitions, public programs, lectures and artists in residence being confirmed with schedule subject to change.  Please visit the Grand Central Art Center website and blog for updates. 


Adam Moser, Cut-Off Men and MLB Tryout Results!

June 15, 2012

We know you have been waiting to hear results of the Major League Baseball tryouts, part of artist/athlete Adam Moser’s Social Practice residence here at Grand Central Art Center.

It’s been an extremely busy week, so we apologize for the delay.  Here is a breakdown of this week’s activities as they played out for Adam’s team, the Cut-Off Men.  Advance warning, this post is a bit long, but we think it’s worth every moment!

In our last blog post, the jerseys and Adam had arrived at Grand Central Art Center, the Cut-Off Men’s clubhouse and lockers were ready for the team’s arrival, and we were looking for one more teammate to fill out a nine-man roster.

On Sunday, Adam was invited by Cut-Off Men teammates Tori and Abraham to join them for one of their league games taking place at Pacifica High School in Garden Grove.   It was a beautiful Southern California day! Adam got a little time in the outfield and a couple of at bats, while Abraham was covering third and Tori at shortstop.  It was a great warm-up for the tryouts to come.

Monday evening, the team arrived early to meet their fellow teammates for the first time, as well as see their new lockers and jerseys (jerseys created by Victory Custom Athletic – thanks again to Claudette Duggan and the Victory team for helping us get these on such a short notice) before the Dutch Treat Dinner/Ball Signing event.  They brought with them their gear to store in their lockers, in preparation for Tuesday mornings early departure to the tryouts.

The team signed some baseballs for one another to get a little practice in before the public ball signing that evening.  They walked together, as a team, down Broadway to Izalco Salvadorian Cuisine on 5th Street, in Downtown Santa Ana.  Thank you to Fernando Valladares of Izalco for opening his restaurant to our team for this event!  Upon arrival, they were met at the restaurant by fans, friends and family.

At the restaurant, the team signed baseballs, met with their new fans, talked baseball and ate pupusas.  They bonded as a team, shared their thoughts about the next day’s tryouts and told stories of their history with the game.  As the night concluded, we headed back to the clubhouse with some of the teams news fans to share the space and further conversation. Before departing for good night sleeps, they tried on their jerseys on for the first time and we had the opportunity to take a more official first team picture.

Tuesday began early, as the team was scheduled to arrive at 6:45 a.m. to suit-up and catch the team van to the tryouts in Compton.  The team was very focused, prepping their gear, getting into their uniforms.  Our team documentarian/filmmaker and Grand Central Art Center current resident, Mickey Fisher, took the opportunity to interview team members to get their thoughts pre-tryouts.  When the team was ready, we met our van driver Rick and loaded the team van for departure.  We would like to THANK Stacy Wilkerson at Gold Coast Tours for all her assistance in helping us schedule a van on such short notice (as we mentioned previously, we just met Adam for the very first time at the Open Engagement Conference in Portland, OR.  On May 19, 2012, he first told us his idea for the project and we agreed to help him realize it).  Stacy, and our driver Rick, were a true pleasure to work with through this project.   And as it turns out, Rick’s brother is a major league scout for the San Francisco Giants, so we got to talk some baseball during the drive north to Compton.

We arrived at the MLB Urban Youth Academy, where Rick drove us right up to the main entrance with VIP service.  As most other individuals were there solo, you could tell immediately, coming as a team was drawing some attention.  The Cut-Off Men, with their team jerseys and van, created quite the buzz!  We could hear other attendees speculating out loud – “who is this team with such a dominant presence?”  The team listened up as instructions for the beginning of the day were delivered and waiver forms were handed out to over 500 individuals there to tryout.  So, like all the others, the Cut-Off Men filled out their forms and waited for further instructions.  Before things got too crazy, our documentarian/filmmaker Mickey took the opportunity to do a few more interviews with the wonderful backdrop of the ballpark.

Pitchers and catchers were instructed to go to one field, infielders and outfielders instructed to go to another.  For the pitchers, they were divided up by those who had previously played in the majors, those currently playing college ball or had played in the last year; and those who were playing in amateur leagues or hadn’t played recently.   On the opposing field, each position player formed into separate lines to receive their numbers.  Once the numbers were assigned, each position was called over by grouping to run their 60 yard dashes against the clock and one opponent.  The pitchers weren’t required to do the run, but more on their requirements later.

As the running continued, the position players on the team had a chance to warm-up their arms and stretch a bit, before all were told to head to the opposing field.  While the fielders had been running the 60 against the clock, the pitchers were showing their stuff on the mound.  The scouts didn’t tell the attendees directly, but it was clearly over heard from the viewing area –  righties that couldn’t throw at least 95mph weren’t being looked at, and lefties that could hit 88mph and had some movement would be considered.

Meanwhile, the position players were once again divided into outfielders and infielders, with infielders being separated further – second base, shortstop and third basemen in one area; and first basemen in another.  The outfielders were up first. Each was required to field fly balls, line drives and grounders, then give their best attempt to test their arms by throwing those fielded balls to a catcher behind home plate. If the scouts like what they saw on the first three attempts, the players would get a bonus ball.  Our only teammate trying out for outfield was Adam, so all eyes were on him.   As the Grand Central Art Center team looked on, Adam proceeded to make two great catches and charged to field one fast grounder.  He then threw each ball, with a gun of an arm, on a fly, straight into the catchers glove.  In an actual game, each of Adam’s throws would have been the perfect opportunity for the out at home.  So perfect was Adam’s fielding and throws, that he received a bonus ball, which he fielded to the same perfection!  With that complete, Adam was able to relax a bit and take in some of the action.

Next, the opportunity for the infielders to show their stuff.  The Cut-Off Men had the left infield covered, with the majority of the teammates playing shortstop and third base, and one trying out for second base.  Our guys looked great out there, fielding their grounders cleanly, charging those balls rolling fast on the infield grass and gunning their throws to first base.  There was a lot of confidence and pride on the field, and the Cut-Off Men proved they knew their way around a diamond.

After all second, shortstop and third base players had their opportunity to show their stuff, it was time for the first basemen skills to be tested.  As the Cut-Off Men were fielding no first basemen, this meant a little downtime, more bonding, sharing of experiences and lunch for the team.

The break didn’t last that long before all players were summoned to the infield for the announcement of who made the cut.  Of the 500 plus players in attendance, it was made clear at the beginning of the day, “dreams would be crushed.”  They were going to announce 40 numbers, which would be of the players who would move forward to play a simulated game on the field. They also made it clear that, of these 40 players, maybe one or two might be approached by a MLB scout at the event with a possible contract offer.  By the end of the announcement, it was clear that it was not the day for the Cut-Off Men; no one for the team would be making it to the big show.

These are the Cut-Off Men!  They are a team and they stand together with pride!  They were there supporting one another, bonding and talking about finding another nine guys who might be interested in a pick-up game.  They were making plans to play a game together this coming weekend.  They gave it their all and left everything they had on that field.  They were proud and able to hold their heads up high, knowing they had just experienced something together that no one could ever take away.

The team spent a few more hours taking in the remainder of the tryouts, watching young recruits give it their all in the hopes of making the next cut.  They shared stories from their  experiences – “the scout told me I was throwing in the mid-80s, which I could hardly believe I still had in me.  Then he told me I had two things going against me, my age and my velocity.”  Team members talked about the guys that they met throughout the day, those on the field with similar hopes and dreams.  It also provided the opportunity for documentarian/filmmaker Mickey to take some iconic shots to add to his footage.

As the tryouts were wrapping-up, we had an amazing chance encounter.  Yes, it was Major League Baseball scouting legend Phil Pote.  You know, the guy with a cameo in Moneyball that asks “Who’s Fabio?”  He is much more famous than that, as he’s been involved with Major League Baseball for over 50 years!  We struck up a conversation by asking whom he thought from today might make it to the big show, and through his answer he pointed at Adam and Erik and said, “you and you.”  OK, first he said that he doesn’t have a crystal ball and has no idea who might make it, since there are so many factors.  Then he said he could just look at guys and say “you and you”, but there is no guarantee.  He asked about our team name and Adam shared the project, talking about Social Practice and the community team he had built.   Phil was enthusiastic about the project and talked a bit of art with us, then told us how he had been playing in Major League Baseball all these years waiting for his acting career to take off.  He shared his amazing screenplay ideas and asked Adam to send him documentation and writing on the project when it was complete.  He handed us all his business card which has a giant “S” logo and reads: Seattle Mariners, Phil Pote, Advisor – Scout.  He introduced us to Ike Hampton, the Manager of the MLB Urban Youth Academy, who also played in the majors as a catcher for the New York Mets (1974), and later California Angels (1975-79).  If you get the opportunity, we highly recommend a trip out to Compton for a visit to the MLB Urban Youth Academy.   It is an outstanding facility and incredible service to the community!  Adam presented both Phil and Ike with a Cut-Off Men signed ball, before Ike had to get back to business.  Phil spent more time with us, as we proceeded to talk baseball with him for another 30-minutes.  His love and knowledge of the game was contagious, and his desire to keep the respect in the game was truly admirable.  Pete should be in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown!  As we wrapped things up, Phil said good bye by giving each of us a high-low-head-on fist bump, then jumped in his car and drove off.  Rick had arrived with the team van, so  it was time to load everything up and head back to Grand Central Art Center.

Upon arrival back at the team clubhouse, a little surprise was in store.  The team planned it perfectly, with Adam asking GCAC Director/Chief Curator John Spiak if he could see the photo we took with Phil Pote’s again.  As soon as Adam had the phone safe in hand, Abraham proceeded to provide Spiak with the traditional post game/victory drenching.  As there was no Gatorade or water cooler, water in a small trashcan would have to do.

It was time for the post tryout team dinner with family and friends.  We headed over to Memphis at the Santora for a celebration and hearty meal with a southern twist.    The dinner also provided an opportunity to celebrate Cut-Off Men Steven’s 25th birthday.  We sang out loud and shared in the glorious day.

Following dinner, we headed back to the clubhouse for the scheduled 7 p.m. press conference.  There, we met with the team from CTV3, who interviewed Adam.  They then handed the microphone to him so he could conduct interviews with his team.  Adam asked about the days experiences – What had been gained?  What had been learned?  How they were feeling?  The CTV3 team will share the coverage link of the story when it’s online, and we will share it with you!

As the team began to change out of uniforms and wind down their day, visitors entered the clubhouse and inquired about the project, including local Santa Ana CSI police officer and photographer, Leonard Correa.  It was at that moment we were able to shift the sports conversation, one which we had so carefully protected over the past three weeks, to a conversation about art.  We had been sharing the art conversation among the artist, his teammates and the GCAC staff over that same period, but publicly we only talked baseball.  Adam explained the workings of Social Practice, the relationships between the teammates and artist, the relationships between the world of baseball and the world of art.  They understood perfectly and shared their insights.  We had a fantastic exchange that included everyone, then we presented each visitor with an autographed team ball.  It was a perfect way to end such an outstanding experience!

So we know you are now asking, just how does this project relate to the workings of Social Practice?  What are the relationships between the teammates and artist? Are there really relationships between the world of baseball and the world of art?  Ponder that for a few days!  We’ve gone on too long with this post already, so we’ll share it in another entry to be posted soon.

The Cut-Off Men film can now be viewed online at: https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/2012/07/02/the-cut-off-men-filmdocumentary-now-online-for-viewing/


GCAC Recognized by Mayor, First Saturday Recap and On Campus Posters!

June 5, 2012

Last night, June 4, at the City of Santa Ana council meeting, Mayor Miguel A. Pulido awarded Grand Central Art Center a Certificate of Recognition in appreciation of GCAC’s long-standing relationship with the City of Santa Ana and the promotion of the arts in the downtown.

Grand Central Art Center is honored to be a part of this great city and thanks the Mayor and entire City Council for their continued support of our institution, exhibitions, programs, outreach and activities. The City and Mayor were there as this institution was first developed and they, and the members of the City Council, are here for us today as this institution continues to develop forward!

The recognition capped of another great weekend of activities that took place at Grand Central Art Center during the First Saturday Art Walk on June 2.

GCAC presented artist and curator receptions for our three current exhibitions, Nadia Osline: All the Queen’s Men, Camilla Taylor: The Disagreement and Millard Sheets Studio: The Art of Home Savings and Loan, curated by CSUF Master Candidates Concepción Rodriguez and Wendy Sherman.  In our GCAC Theater Space, Tony Sheets and professional storyteller Jim Cogan shared with the audience memories and personal stories on the life of Millard Sheets.

Danny with artist Naida Osline

Along with the reception and talk, the surprise performance art piece Guerrilla Gowns, organized and performed by CSUF current students, alum and Grand Central Art Center MFA residences, occurred on our 2nd street promenade.


Just another active night in downtown Santa Ana, CA.

And to top this off, Grand Central Art Center poster announcements are popping up all over the CSUF main campus this week. We’re excited to continue engaging students, staff, faculty and administration with our programming.

Mark your calendar, our next big opening celebrating the 10th year anniversary of ISM takes place July 7th!


Open Engagement, AAM, Social Practice and a Forward Vision @ Grand Central Art Center

May 24, 2012

Social Practice is a major focus of our Forward Vision at Grand Central Art Center (GCAC), so we were honored by an invitation to participate in the Open Engagement conference in Portland, Oregon (May 18-20).  GCAC was represented on two panels by Director/Chief Curator John D. Spiak, which included:

René de Guzman, Dominic Willsdon, John D. Spiak, Stephanie Parrish, Allison Agsten

It Turns Out There Is Room For Everyone: Museums and Social Practice – with panelists Dominic Willsdon (SFMOMA), Allison Agsten (Hammer Museum), René de Guzman (Oakland Museum of California), Stephanie Parrish (Portland Art Museum) and John D. Spiak (Grand Central Art Center). Moderated by Harrell Fletcher (Portland State University).

and

Gregory Sale, John D. Spiak, Pete Brook, Julie Perini

Prison Communities: You Can’t Arrest Your Way to a Solution. Social Practice Engaging the Criminal Justice System – with panelists Gregory Sale, John D. Spiak, Pete Brook, Rachel Marie-Crane Williams and Julie Perini.

Bernie Díaz (Faculty @ SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts), Ariel Gentalen, Karla Monterrey, Shannon Jackson (Director of ARC @ UC Berkeley), Carlin Boyle

We were able to encourage, with the help of GCAC Artist in Residence Jules Rochielle, a few California State University Fullerton students, a faculty and staff member to attend the conference.  Those in attendance included: CSUF students Carlin Boyle, Ariel Gentalen, Karla Monterrey; CSUF faculty member Gretchen Potts; and CSUF staff member Mylan Chacon.  The conference allowed the opportunity for these individuals to connect with national figures of the art world, including artists, theorists, educators and curators.  It was clear that these individuals were truly inspired by the experience.  We are sure this will have a major impact on GCAC and the CSUF College of Art, especially starting next semester, as these individuals are playing key roles on the campus community – Karla leading CSUF Arts Week this coming year; Ariel leading the CSUF Arts Inter-Club Council; and Carlin through her Evoke Unity efforts.

Three weeks ago, Spiak also represented GCAC through two panels at the American Association of Museums Annual Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which included:

Getting into the Bones: Museums, Dance and Social Action – with panelists Gregory Sale (Arizona State University), Robin Conrad (Fullerton College), Elizabeth Johnson (Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts) and John D. Spiak (Grand Central Art Center)

and

Kris Morrissey, Robert Garfinkle, John D. Spiak, Emily F. Zimmern, Thomas M. Finkelpearl

New Roles/New Culture: Tackling Tough Topics and Engaging New Audiences – with panelists Thomas M. Finkelpearl (Queens Museum of Art), Emily F. Zimmern (Levine Museum of the New South), Robert Garfinkle (Science Museum of Minnesota) and John D. Spiak (Grand Central Art Center).  Moderated by Kris Morrissey (Director, Museology Program, University of Washington).

The inspiration and knowledge these conferences provided inform this institution as our Forward Vision document develops and becomes more refined.

The in-progress Forward Vision for Grand Central Art Center focuses on the belief that the key to success in Social Practice Residencies is complete honesty, trust and openness by the institution, curator and artist with all potential collaborators and participants. GCAC is open to exploring, through artistic practice and conversation, the complexities of society – acknowledging that we may raise more questions than perhaps answer.  This institution is open to flexibility and adjustment throughout a project/residency as envisioned by the artist, leaving the opportunity for new discoveries to develop – creating the possibilities for even greater, successful and mutually beneficial outcomes for artist, institution and collaborator.  We use the term “successful” loosely, as we acknowledge that failure of a process also brings knowledge.  These rules should apply to any institution exhibition, program or project, but they are even more essential when working with community and artists through Social Practice residence.  Without an honest approach, trust cannot be secured to build connections with diverse individuals through an artist’s vision.

Shannon Jackson (Open Engagement Keynote)

We also acknowledge the kinds of results that often occur at the conclusion of a residency or Social Practice based project are not always easily measured, in the traditional sense.  For example, attendance figures, tour numbers and budgets may not be the most appropriate measures of “success.”  Unfortunately, these are the most common types of statistics that funders and agencies require in grant reports, usually due immediately upon completion of the project.

GCAC understands that many projects in Social Practice should not, and can not, be limited by a set timeline for completion.  Therefore, it is our goal to provide an artist time needed to realize their vision.  Often the first question asked by individuals when inquiring of our Artist in Residence program is “how long is each residency?”  To this we will answer, “we do not know,” as each will be determined by the artist, their project and their collaborators working through GCAC.  We also understand that even though a project might be considered complete, impact of that project, and even the project itself, may continue beyond the artist and institution.

If It Doesn’t It Should (Open Engagement Panel) – Ted Purves, Harrell Fletcher, Cassandra Thornton

GCAC will look at traditional and standard matrix measurements for each project, but we will also measure, validate and share the success, and/or failure, of each Social Practice Residency through the following:  gathering of personal stories and testimonials (artist, institution, organizations, community); presenting at national conferences (American Association of Museums, College Art Association, Open Engagement); creating web and print based documentation (website, blog, catalogues); writing and publishing articles in national journals (Museum and Social Issues, Art Education, Journal of Art for Life); and direct sharing with colleagues of peer institutions and through society itself.

The Social Practice Artist in Residence is just one component of our institution, but the philosophies of this program will guide GCAC in the further development of Forward Vision documents for our exhibitions, education, public programs and outreach.  Their outcomes will be measured in the same fashion and be accountable to our mission as a contemporary art center.  We will raise questions, allow inquire, be open to opposing view points, be challenged and/or criticized, in the hope of understanding greater society, the role of contemporary art and our shared, or unshared, experiences.  It is important for us as a contemporary art center to acknowledge that we may not be able to change lives or minds, but it is our hope to change moments.


Field Report from Artist in Residence: Jules Rochielle

April 19, 2012

An update about the Grand Central Artist in Residency Project:
In an effort to begin a project that reflected the needs of the community surrounding Grand Central Art Center, the months of March and April have been filled with a range of community building activities. In order to build a strong set of community connections we felt that it was necessary to conduct a number of creative team planning sessions within our own group and also with a variety of community groups located in Santa Ana. As an aspect of this process we have conducted outreach to El Centro, the Orange County May Day Coalition, the Teen Space connected to Santa Ana Public Library, and we also arranged meetings with a variety of community businesses and community members.

What is  “Social Practice Fieldwork”:
The community outreach process used to meet the community has been one of direct outreach and participation. This has included attending and direct participation in community discussion groups, and gender workshops, community bbq’s, May Day planning sessions, and other small meetings that have introduced a variety community members to one another.

We recently also attended the California State University Fullerton 8th Annual Social Justice Summit called Unite to Rise Above Apathy– through this action we ended up meeting and getting connected to a ton of social engaged community groups. And we hope to conduct some follow up meetings with many of the groups we met.

As an aspect of the direct participation in community and our outreach to community we have a also decided to work with community leaders as a volunteer  for skills and time needed to improve a website for the Orange County May Day Coalition. This is a work in progress. This aspect of our engagement with the community in Santa Ana has been completely rewarding.

The Storefront Studio Project:
During April, we participated in the Santa Ana Art Walk– this is the first time  that we activated the A.I.R studio. On the evening of the art walk we invited Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz, to enact and perform Pura Cháchara which is part of  her larger project called Translation Nation.

We also activated our window front and installed our audio stations by opening a storefront studio project called What is Democracy?. This aspect of the residency is a storefront project meant to connect with the communities opinions about the meaning of the word “democracy”. The storefront is open Tuesday through Friday from 4-7pm. We program special events, talks and public gatherings. Recently, Jules Rochielle and Christina Sanchez worked along with the Santa Ana Public Library team consisting of Cheryl Eberly and Zulma Zepeda to hold two young women’s identity discussions circles.

The Writing Component of a Social Art Practice:
The residency opportunity has also provided the opportunity for the artist to complete a number of writing projects. While in residency, Jules Rochielle recently published an article with Public Art Review for Issue 46 • spring / summer 2012— Food for Thought. The writing team consisting of, Jules Rochielle and Janet Owen Driggs recently completed a new piece of writing for a new second commission publication with Proboscis. This piece is currently being published and it will be the second part to the book set called Material Conditions I. This writing team also submitted a text about collaboration and “together work”for a book project that emerged out of last years Congress of Collectives. Jules is also currently producing a set of oral history interviews for the oral history aspect of Unfinished Business, 25 Years of Discourse in Los Angeles,LA Forum for Architecture and Urban Design

Upcoming Activities:
On April 29th, Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz and Jules Rochielle will work with Arts Orange County lead a participatory movement workshop for the Día Del Niño” / Day of the Child. This event will take place at Birch Park in Santa Ana.

On April 30th, we were invited to conduct a set of student interviews about the word Democracy on the university campus of California State University Fullerton.  A big THANK YOU goes out to Bonnie Joy Massey.

May 1: May Day in Santa Ana: Community Story Collection and Protest.  During the busy month of May, we will be working at the individual and community level to directly participate in a variety of events associated with the Orange County May Day Coalition.  We hope to continue to work within the community to produce and capture an audio archive of the events taking place in Santa Ana.

May 2nd- May 5th: We will also be working with the artist Carmen Montoya during this time. We hope to run a set of community art making workshops with Carmen on May 2nd- May 5th. Carmen has been actively engaged with a group known as Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (Northwest Treeplanters and Farmworkers United), is Oregon’s union of farmworkers, nursery, and reforestation workers, and Oregon’s largest Latino organization.We are hoping to garner enough community support to be able to work with Carmen to create a set of powerful  images to take back to the Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste.

May 5th: For the Santa Ana Art Walk:  We are also excited to announce a collaborative effort with a group called Evoke Unity. We will work together to activate the What is Democracy? storefront space and to engage the community. We met this dynamic young group of artists at  California State Fullerton 8th Annual Social Justice Summit called Unite to Rise Above Apathy

Evoke Unity, is a grassroots project developed by undergraduates from the Art Department of the College of the Arts, was created to discuss cultural diversity and identity among today’s students. This installation brings to light that our campus population is made up of students from over 80 nations. Evoke Unity hopes to convey that our success as a university community is due in large measure to these diverse backgrounds and perspectives.

Saturday, May 12th – 3:30 to 5
A big ThankYyou goes out to Bonnie Joy Massey. Thank you for asking us to particpate”
Grand Central Art Center,125 N Broadway.Santa Ana CA 92701
Speakers:”Successes and Failures of Democratic Social Movements in South Africa.”Alan Emery, Assistant Professor of Sociology at CSUF “Reviving the Left.” Steve Jobbit, Assistant Professor of History at CSUF.
Stop by and participate in What is Democracy? an art project developed by artist Jules Rochielle. Record your opinions and your story about the meaning of democracy today.

May 17-May 21: The Open Engagement Conference in Portland Oregon:
Jules Rochielle and the (SPAN)Social Practices Art Network will be part of this years Open Engagement 2012. The residency has allowed time to be made available for some more of the archived interviews to be produced to share through a presentations at Open Engagement. We are also trying to co-write a short essay along with John Spiak for a publication that will emerge out of this convening.

Open Engagement is an international conference that sets out to explore various perspectives on art and social practice and expand the dialogue around socially engaged art making. The Open Engagement conference is an initiative of Portland State University’s Art and Social Practice MFA concentration. Directed and founded by Jen Delos Reyes and planned in conjunction with the Art and Social Practice students, this year’s conference features keynote presenters Tania Bruguera, Shannon Jackson, and Paul Ramirez Jonas. The work by these artists and scholars touch on subjects including politics, economies, education, and representation.

Student Voices at What Is Democracy?


On April 21,2012: Today a group of students gathered for a diversity conference just stopped by to tell a few stories about youth and democracy.http://www.mcnc.us/professional-development/student-leadership-initiative/ —  at What Is Democracy, Grand Central Art Center.

Here is what they said about the word “democracy”

Beyond May…..well we have accomplished this much between March 6th and April 19th. There are many things currently being discussed with various community stakeholders in Santa Ana and we will post again as soon as we gain clarity about future activities.