SANTA ANA PUBLIC LIBRARY/ GCAC COLLABORATION RECEIVES $10,000 CAL HUMANITIES 2013 COMMUNITY STORIES GRANT!

January 14, 2013

Lara Montagne, Marco, GCAC Artist in Residence Jules Rochielle, and Manny Escamilla of the Santa Ana Public Library - planning meeting @ The Grain Project in Jerome Park, Townsend/Raitt neighborhood.

Lara Montagne, Marco, GCAC Artist in Residence Jules Rochielle, and Manny Escamilla of the Santa Ana Public Library – planning meeting @ The Grain Project in Jerome Park, Townsend/Raitt neighborhood.

Cal Humanities has recently announced the 2013 Community Stories grant awardees. The Santa Ana Public Library has been awarded $10,000 for its project entitled The Raitt St. Chronicles: A Survivors Oral History.

Community Stories is a competitive grant program of Cal Humanities. Grants are awarded to projects that give expression to the extraordinary variety of histories and experiences of California’s places and people to ensure that the stories can be shared widely. These narratives help us find our commonalities, appreciate our differences, and learn something new about how to live well together.

To accomplish these goals, the Santa Ana Public Library will partner with California State University Fullerton’s Grand Central Art Center, working through GCAC Artist in Residence Jules Rochielle, CSUF American Studies Lecturer Sharon Sekhon and artist/education Christina Sanchez, to train teens to collect oral histories from the Townsend/Raitt neighborhood. An additional academic partner on the project will be Ana Elizabeth Rosas, Assistant Professor, Chicano/Latino Studies, School of Social Sciences, Assistant Professor, History, School of Humanities and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Chicano-Latino Studies at University of California, Irvine. Project mentors will train youth participants to collect, archive, and share the underreported stories of survival from one of Santa Ana’s most at-risk communities. Over the course of 12 months the participants will record video interviews with survivors of violence and make them available on various social media websites. These will serve as the basis of a 15-minute mini-documentary on the history of the neighborhood that will be presented in various local venues as well as online.

“With our state’s incredible diversity, fostering communication and connecting people to a range of ideas is vital for our general welfare,” said Ralph Lewin, president and CEO of Cal Humanities. “Our grant award enables awardees to pursue the important work of engaging new audiences in conversations around stories of significance to Californians.”

Since 2003, Cal Humanities has supported approximately 400 story projects and granted over $2.8 million to enable communities to voice, record, and share histories – many previously untold or little known. Through video, photography, murals, zines, documentary theater, audio projects, and more, these collected stories have been shared with broad audiences, both live and virtual. Cal Humanities is an independent non-profit state partner of the National endowment for the Humanities.

For more information on Cal Humanities, please visit http://www.calhum.org.

THE SANTA ANA PUBLIC LIBRARY IS LOCATED AT: 26 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA (corner of Civic Center and Ross)


SOC(i)AL: ART + PEOPLE – GCAC participating in free public series of roundtable discussions and weekend events

September 26, 2012
Grand Central Art Center is excited to be part of an outstanding series of roundtable discussions and weekend events taking place this fall.

Thank You to Anne Bray of Freewaves for instigated this series and the generous invitation extended to GCAC to participate!
Say passé to the sculpture in the square; the leading edge of public art is changing. Art is passing from isolation, to intervention, to participation, to engagement, to integration.SOC(i)AL: Art + People is a free, public series of roundtable discussions and weekend events. . .

that explores socially engaged art in Southern California from East to West.  Join the dialogue with SoCal artists, scholars, activists, and administrators as we think about socially engaged art in relation to zoning, technology, ethics, food, ritual, performance, gentrification, museums, democracy, nature and art support structures in the here-and-now.

Where is our collective dialogic imagination now?The series of individually produced events takes place at venues across L.A.,
• instigated by Anne Bray as part of Freewaves.org,
• promoted by media partner ForYourArt,
• interviewed by Sue Bell Yank  in advance of each event at KCET.org/Artbound
• and summarized by a different writer after each event there too.
• As many as of the talks as permissible will be audio recorded and posted there too.

SCHEDULE:

MAK Center, ARTISTS + INSTITUTIONS: What Is The Common Ground For Artists and Institutions?
Salon-style discussions about collectives and artists-run initiatives, graduate programs in social and public practice, and museums dedicated to novel fulfillment of educational programming.  Dialog prompts, generated by well-known artists and institutions, will be presented to the public for an evening of critical discussion and lively debate, comfortably hosted within the historic rooms and gardens of the Schindler house.
• Thursday, October 4, 7-9pm
• 835 North Kings Road, West Hollywood, CA
• organized by Kimberli Meyer (Mak Center), David Burns (Fallen Fruit) and Sara Daleiden (Los Angeles Urban Rangers);  features artists Sarah Beadle, Notch, and Christina Sanchez; Special thanks to Whole Foods Market for their generous support.

Creative Time Summit– a global annual conference exploring the intersection of art-making and social justice, streaming from NYC
• Friday, October 12, 7 am to 3:30 pm
• Watch On Livestream.com and respond on twitter #CTSummit
• Share the Summit with L.A. via streaming at Metabolic Studio, 1745 N. Spring St. #4, 90012,
coffee, bagels and comfy seats provided
• See http://creativetime.org/summit/

Occidental College:  Can the Sidewalk be a Stage?
• Thursday, October 18, 7 pm
• Dumke Commons,  Swan West 119B, 1600 Campus Dr  LA 90041
• Speakers: Lake Sharpe of Body City dance troupe, Tucker Neel, Stephen VanDyck, coordinated by artist Mary Beth Heffernan with Center with Community Based Learning and Department of Art History and Visual Arts.

EVENT: Public Matters Event: Market Makeover Smackdown
Fun, hands-on activities to help green the food desert and support sustainable change in the East L.A. food environment.
• Saturday, October 20, 10am-1pm
Ramirez Meat Market, 3618 Folsom Street at Rowan and
Yash La Casa Market, 3968 Hammel at Hazard, in East L.A.
• Participants: Mike Blockstein and Reanne Estrada, Public Matters; students from School of  Communications, New Media and Technology (CNMT) at Roosevelt High School, with UCLA-USC Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD)

Otis Graduate Public Practice at 18th Street Art Center:
What Can We Learn from dOCUMENTA (13)?
Through presentations from artists and curators who participated in or visited one of this year’s most important exhibitions in contemporary art, the evening will look at projects and reflect on the relation to social practice right now.  What can we learn from the art projects, curatorial practice, expanded notions of location, pedagogy, and their intersections?
• Wednesday, October 24, 7 pm
• 1639 18th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404
• moderated by Pilar Tompkins Rivas, Director of Residency Programs at 18th Street Arts Center
• Ciara Ennis, Director/Curator, Pitzer Art Galleries, Pitzer College
• Rita Gonzalez, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at LACMA
• Masood Kamandy, artist, participant in dOCUMENTA(13)
• Leslie Labowitz-Starus, artist
• Tamarind Rossetti,  intern with Mariam Ghani at dOCUMENTA(13) and Graduate Public Practice artist
• John Tain, art historian and curator for Modern and Contemporary Collections at the Getty Research Institute

ACLA Park, La Culebera: Can Artists Heal Nature in LA?
Artists address the question in the format of a PechaKucha and roundtable discussion
• October 25, 7 pm
• 240 S. Ave. 57, Highland Park, CA 90042
• moderated by Stephanie Pincetl, Director of the California Center for Sustainable Communities
• artists:  Hadley Arnold, Allison Behrstock, Olivia Chumacero,  Janet Owen Driggs, Ron Finley, Jenny Price, Jane Tsong, Tricia Ward, and others
• Potluck at 6.30pm. Bring food to share, or just your utensils to help make this a zero waste event.

EVENT: Tongva Talk, a Cultural Campfire,
is a time to gather around the fire and exchange knowledge and stories of indigenous history, culture and traditions, organized monthly by Olivia Chumacero. This event highlights storytelling by Tongvans.
• Friday, November 2, 7:30 pm
• Anabolic Monument, Native Plant Garden ceremonial space, at north end of the Los Angeles State Historic Park,  1245 N. Spring Los Angeles, CA 90012. Parking available on Baker Street. Bring a blanket or chair to sit on the sand.  Join in potluck dinner by bringing your own utensils.
• everythingismedicine.wordpress.com

Freewaves and UCLA IMLab at Chiparaki:
Can Artists Use Technology to Enable Communities?
Roundtable discussion, Everyone Welcome
• Saturday November 3, 1 pm
• 1637 N Spring St,  N Chinatown, 90012,  enter on Baker Street
• Fabian Wagmister (UCLA IMLab), Pedro Joel Espinosa (IDEPSCA’s Mobile Voices), Vicki Callahan (USC IML), Micha Cardenas, Shagha Ariannia  (Long Story Short), Anne Bray (Freewaves)

18th Street Art Center:  Museum Programming and their constituencies:
The case of the Queens Museum of Art and Corona Plaza
• Saturday, November 3, 5 pm
• 1639 18th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404
• Hosted and moderated by Bill Kelley Jr., 18th Street Art Center Curator in Residence
• Prerana Reddy has been the Director of Public Events for Queens Museum of Art in New York City since 2005. Reddy also spearheads the Museum’s community engagement initiatives combining arts and culture with social development goals in nearby neighborhoods predominately comprised of new immigrants, including programs that address language access, healthcare, public space advocacy, and the mortgage crisis.

LACE: Can LA Make Socially Engaged Art Happen?
Roundtable Workshop to explore the possibilities and limits of current organizational models and curatorial strategies that support Social Engagement Art practices. From trust building and community process to  funding and timing, this session invites participants to grapple with fundamental questions —  How to sustain a project?   How to represent in the community?  How  long will the work really take?
• Saturday, November 10   1 to 4pm
• 6522 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood 90028
• Kim Abeles (artist),  John Spiak (curator/director, Grand Central Art Center), Carol Stakenas (LACE) and others
• with the exhibition (Re-) Cycles of Paradise

Getty Museum: Do We Need Artists in Art Museums?
Does the role of an artist at museums stop once his or her art enters the collection and is displayed in the galleries? A growing number of museums are bringing artists into the fold – whether or not their art is displayed – and asking them to call on their own practices to devise creative opportunities for engaging diverse audiences and communities.  This panel of artists who have engaged museum audiences, and museum staff who have engaged artists, explores how museums reach communities through artists, and asks whether this is true engagement or mere flirtation.
• November 14, 7 pm
• 1200 Getty Center Dr.  Los Angeles, 90049
• Speakers TBD

Self Help Graphics + The School of Echoes:
How Can Artists and the Eastside Generate Change Together?
Is the community or the artists the protagonists? What is the role of the artist as community and vice versa? How can Artists/community drive the visioning and planning of an arts district before it happens?  How do we move beyond participants, observers, beautifiers and “decorators” and into a more integrated part of development planning?
• November 17, 4 pm
• 1300 East 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA 90033
• Evonne Gallardo (Self Help Graphics), Sandra de la Loza (artist), Alfred Fraijo Jr. (LURN: Leadership for Urban Renewal Now), Elizabeth Blaney, Leon Mostovoy, Dont Rhine, Walt Senterfitt, Leonardo Vilchis, (members of groups Ultra-red, The School of Echoes, Union de Vecinos, Woodcraft Rangers, Dept. of Public Health)

USC Roski School of Fine Art:
Occupy the Mind: Pedagogy, ‘Capitalocentrism’ and the Arts Fantasy
• November 30, Friday 3-5 pm
• 3001 S. Flower St. Los Angeles, CA 90007
• Coordinated by Kelly Akashi, Rhea Anastas, Katherine Bray, Connie Butler, Jud Fine, Jack Halberstam, A.L. Steiner, and Noura Wedell
• Participants: TBD

PAST but posted online:

USC Price School: Is LA the Creative or Anti-Creative City?
What are lines that our regulations and laws draw around the arts, exploring the edges between art and the city? Do artists represent only gentrification for our communities? How does art, and how do artists add value to urban life? How should planners consider art and artists? How do planning regulations aid the creation of a creatively vibrant city that adds not only economic value but also cultural excitement to the lives of urban residents?
• Urban Growth Seminar on Tuesday, September 18, 12 noon to 1:30 pm
• At USC Lewis Hall 101
• Elizabeth Currid (USC Price) and Sarah Schrank (History, CSULB), moderated by David Sloane (USC Price)
• posted at USC Youtube channel of the Urban Growth Seminar
• audio posted at KCET.org/Artboundcolumn of Sue Bell YankMORE DETAILS:

http://freewaves.org/public-art-social-practice/a-series-of-discussions-about-socially-engaged-art-in-l-a-fall-2012/


Lisa Bielawa – Artist in Residence – Site Visit #1 @ Grand Central Art Center

June 30, 2012

It’s been an exciting week, with Grand Central Art Center having been extremely fortunate to host artist/composer/vocalist Lisa Bielawa as a visiting Artist in Residence.  This was Lisa’s first site visit to Downtown Santa Ana, as she begins the process of developing a larger project and an extended residency.

We worked to introduce Lisa to individuals in our community and sites around Orange County of possible interest.  The visit allowed her to experience our community, this region and to begin developing ideas for projects that could be realized through her artistic vision.

Tom Burke, Flying Bull, Inc. and a Special Events Consultant, provided a tour of the airstrips of the former Marine Corp Air Station El Toro in Irvine, now part of the development in process of the expanding Orange County Great Park.  Lisa was interested in visiting the site as she is currently developing projects on former runways as part of her upcoming Tempelhof Broadcast.  the Tempelhof Broadcast will be performed on the Tempelhof Airport runway in Berlin, and in development for performance on Crissy Field, San Francisco.  Tom shared brief histories of the site and recent activities, as we walked the runways and Lisa tested the sites sound qualities at distances.  It was a clear morning and the songbirds in the adjoining fields were clearly happy.

Lisa met with Allen Moon, of the David Lieberman Artists’ Representative, as they discussed the current international creative scene and the many individual acquaintances and friends they had in common.  Allen shared his perspectives of Downtown Santa Ana, along with his vast knowledge of the greater Orange County community and the individuals here for whom Lisa would benefit by meeting.

Dr. Pamela Madsen, composer, performer and scholar, California State University, Fullerton’s Music Department, met with Lisa at the recommendation of Allen.  She shared information on her role as director of CSUF’s New Music Festival, including her vision for the 2013 festival.  They talked about the current voice, music and composer communities of Southern California, including individuals involved with our colleague SoCal universities of CSU Long Beach, Chapman University, University of California Irvine, Los Angeles and San Diego, and the possibilities for collaboration.

Dennis Lluy, owner of Downtown Santa Ana’s Yost Theater, connected with us for even more inspirational conversation.  For a bit of background, the Yost Theater it the oldest theater in Orange County, originally built in 1912 during the Vaudeville movement.  Dennis has spent the past five years renovating the theater to an original feel and passionate authenticity.  Dennis is an amazing thinker and long-term generous supporter of Grand Central Art Center, as well as the OC Arts community in general.  After grabbing a bite to eat at Chapter One restaurant, we walked over to the Yost to spend some more time in the venue.  Lisa visited the site on the first day of her residency, but this return visit provided her the opportunity to wander through the space and test the theaters natural acoustics.  The space is amazingly live, with a hammered tin ceiling that helps to project a voice throughout, engulfing the site with beauty!

Along with the individuals from our direct community, we were also able to engage Lisa with artists currently connected with Grand Central Art Center.  We attended the UCLA Hammer Museum Yearbook Signing Party hosted by the Hammer for artists Adam Moser and Harrell Fletcher.  You probably recognize Adam’s name, since he just completed his Artist in Residence project here at GCAC, The Cut-Off Men.  At the event, Lisa was able to engage a bit with the Hammer‘s Curator of Public Engagement Allison Agsten and Senior Curator Anne Ellegood. She was able to have extended conversation regarding Social Practice, recent projects and the contemporary art scene of Southern California with Adam, Andrew Douglas of the Metabolic Studio, and Contemporary Art Curator Cassandra Coblentz (full disclosure, Cassandra is married to John Spiak, GCAC Director/Chief Curator).

We were fortunate to also have back at GCAC artist in residence Jules Rochielle.  She is here for another site visit, as she continues to connect with our community and further develop her project – meeting with individuals from El Centro and the Santa Ana Public Library.  Jules visit provided the opportunity to gather a few other Southern California artists for conversation and a quick breakfast gathering.  Joining us were recent OTIS MFA in Public Practice graduate Christina Sanchez and Los Angeles based artist Nancy Popp, who was recently named InterArts Chair at the Idyllwild Arts Academy.

More site visits were worked into the schedule, and through the recommendation of Jules, Lisa toured the Santa Ana River, which stretches 29 miles from Huntington Beach to Corona, and is located a couple of blocks from GCAC.  Walking the bike path, she explored the space and considered its concrete valley and closed railroad bridges as possible project sites.

Wednesday afternoon, Lisa hopped on the train at our local Santa Ana Train Station (again, a few short block from GCAC) and made the quick one-hour trip down to San Diego.  Once there, she first met with Steven Schick, Conductor of the La Jolla Symphony & Chorus.  She shared with him her experiences as artist in residence at Grand Central Art Center and her current thoughts related to project ideas.  They were able to brainstorm together and consider collaborative possibilities.  In the evening, she connected with Jim Rosenfield, President of the Mata Festival Board.  Lisa is actually one of the co-founder of the Mata Festival, with Philip Glass and Eleonor Sandresky.  Lisa had the opportunity to share more information regarding Grand Central Art Center’s vision with Mr. Rosenfield and talk about concepts for her project to be realized through our institution.

Thursday, before departing for the airport, Lisa met with Cathi Douglas, Editor of CSUF’s Titan Magazine.  The Titan Magazine team is working on an article about GCAC.  Lisa sat down with their team for a photo shoot, before meeting with Cathi for an interview at the Gypsy Den Grand Central Cafe.  Make sure to keep any eye out for an article on GCAC in an upcoming issue of Titan Magazine!

And with a packed schedule, somehow Lisa still found some quiet time throughout the week to sit within our GCAC Black Box Theatre, at the piano, working to compose new work for additional upcoming projects in her life.

Yes, another extremely successful visit by an outstanding artist who we are excited to have back in the very near future.  We’ll keep you posted as the project continues to develop and we will let you know dates for Lisa’s return when they are official.


What a Weekend @ Grand Central Art Center!

May 7, 2012

We kicked off this past weekend on Friday, by engaging with Social Practice collaborative artists Owen Driggs, through their Performing Public Space Loitering Project.  Invited as part of Jules Rochielle’s Artist in Residence at GCAC, Janet Owen and Matt Driggs took visiting artists Jules Rochielle, Maria Del Carmen Montoya, Christina Sanchez, Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz, and Cypress College art professor Ed Giardina and his students Brian Yellowshirt McNamara and Luis Munoz-Najar, on a loitering adventure of Downtown Santa Ana.  Owen Driggs and Maria Del Carmen Montoya were exploring the area in preparation of future visits and activities in associating with Rochielle’s GCAC Artist in Residence throughout the summer and fall.

 

Saturday’s activities started with an outstanding talk by author Gustavo Arellano.  He shared with those in attendance the history of Mexican food in the US, through stories from research for his latest book Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.   Following the talk, Gustavo graciously signed copies of the book for those in attendance.  Thank you to Rueben Martinez of Libreia Martinez Book and Art Gallery for providing the publications for the event.  Thank you as well to Gustavo for allowing us this opportunity – sharing your knowledge and providing engaged insights, all with such humor and grace!

 

It was the monthly First Saturday Art Walk in Downtown Santa Ana, as well as Cinco de Mayo, so that could only mean a joyous night of opening receptions and cultural activities throughout the city.

Grand Central Art Center opened three new exhibitions to a very large and receptive audience.  The artists, curators and GCAC team did the center proud, with top quality exhibitions throughout, so we thank them all for their hard work, passion and talent.

The exhibitions included:

Naida Osline: All the Queen’s Men

 

Millard Sheets Studio: The Art of Home Savings and Loan

Curated by Concepcion Rodriguez and Wendy Sherman

 

Camilla Taylor: The Disagreement

Curated by Yevgeniya Mikhailik

 

Along with Saturday’s three opening receptions, California State University, Fullerton’s student project Evoke Unity engaged with Jules Rocheille’s What is Democracy?, creating an interactive/participatory installation in the GCAC AIR studio space.  Thank you to our outstanding CSUF students for their hard work, dedication and engaged approach to art making.  Many of these students, along with the artists who participated in the loitering of Downtown Santa Ana, will be joining us at the Open Engagement conference in Portland, OR, May 18-20.

 

And what celebration would be complete without some traditional Lucha Libre on the front 2nd Street promenade?  What power, what force, what energy – truly entertaining!

 

Sunday afternoon provided the opportunity for an educated conversation on the work of Millard Sheets and his studio.  The lively and informative panel, Dr. Adam Arenson, Alan Hess, Mike McGee, provide outstanding perspective and historic background to the work of this artist, designer and architect.  They shared their knowledge and research on the importance of the masterful artist and the impact he, along with Howard Ahmanson and Home Savings and Loan, played on the landscape, history and vision of Southern California.

 

And to round out the weekend activities, members of Southern California Artists (SCA) joined GCAC Director/Chief Curator John D. Spiak for an evening of conversation at the center.  The group discussed the current series of exhibitions, the future vision and residency programs of GCAC, and shared views on Social Practice.

Thank you to all that continue to participate and contribute to the programming of Grand Central Art Center, we truly appreciate your support, enthusiasm and insights!


Field Report from Artist in Residence: Jules Rochielle

April 19, 2012

An update about the Grand Central Artist in Residency Project:
In an effort to begin a project that reflected the needs of the community surrounding Grand Central Art Center, the months of March and April have been filled with a range of community building activities. In order to build a strong set of community connections we felt that it was necessary to conduct a number of creative team planning sessions within our own group and also with a variety of community groups located in Santa Ana. As an aspect of this process we have conducted outreach to El Centro, the Orange County May Day Coalition, the Teen Space connected to Santa Ana Public Library, and we also arranged meetings with a variety of community businesses and community members.

What is  “Social Practice Fieldwork”:
The community outreach process used to meet the community has been one of direct outreach and participation. This has included attending and direct participation in community discussion groups, and gender workshops, community bbq’s, May Day planning sessions, and other small meetings that have introduced a variety community members to one another.

We recently also attended the California State University Fullerton 8th Annual Social Justice Summit called Unite to Rise Above Apathy– through this action we ended up meeting and getting connected to a ton of social engaged community groups. And we hope to conduct some follow up meetings with many of the groups we met.

As an aspect of the direct participation in community and our outreach to community we have a also decided to work with community leaders as a volunteer  for skills and time needed to improve a website for the Orange County May Day Coalition. This is a work in progress. This aspect of our engagement with the community in Santa Ana has been completely rewarding.

The Storefront Studio Project:
During April, we participated in the Santa Ana Art Walk– this is the first time  that we activated the A.I.R studio. On the evening of the art walk we invited Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz, to enact and perform Pura Cháchara which is part of  her larger project called Translation Nation.

We also activated our window front and installed our audio stations by opening a storefront studio project called What is Democracy?. This aspect of the residency is a storefront project meant to connect with the communities opinions about the meaning of the word “democracy”. The storefront is open Tuesday through Friday from 4-7pm. We program special events, talks and public gatherings. Recently, Jules Rochielle and Christina Sanchez worked along with the Santa Ana Public Library team consisting of Cheryl Eberly and Zulma Zepeda to hold two young women’s identity discussions circles.

The Writing Component of a Social Art Practice:
The residency opportunity has also provided the opportunity for the artist to complete a number of writing projects. While in residency, Jules Rochielle recently published an article with Public Art Review for Issue 46 • spring / summer 2012— Food for Thought. The writing team consisting of, Jules Rochielle and Janet Owen Driggs recently completed a new piece of writing for a new second commission publication with Proboscis. This piece is currently being published and it will be the second part to the book set called Material Conditions I. This writing team also submitted a text about collaboration and “together work”for a book project that emerged out of last years Congress of Collectives. Jules is also currently producing a set of oral history interviews for the oral history aspect of Unfinished Business, 25 Years of Discourse in Los Angeles,LA Forum for Architecture and Urban Design

Upcoming Activities:
On April 29th, Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz and Jules Rochielle will work with Arts Orange County lead a participatory movement workshop for the Día Del Niño” / Day of the Child. This event will take place at Birch Park in Santa Ana.

On April 30th, we were invited to conduct a set of student interviews about the word Democracy on the university campus of California State University Fullerton.  A big THANK YOU goes out to Bonnie Joy Massey.

May 1: May Day in Santa Ana: Community Story Collection and Protest.  During the busy month of May, we will be working at the individual and community level to directly participate in a variety of events associated with the Orange County May Day Coalition.  We hope to continue to work within the community to produce and capture an audio archive of the events taking place in Santa Ana.

May 2nd- May 5th: We will also be working with the artist Carmen Montoya during this time. We hope to run a set of community art making workshops with Carmen on May 2nd- May 5th. Carmen has been actively engaged with a group known as Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (Northwest Treeplanters and Farmworkers United), is Oregon’s union of farmworkers, nursery, and reforestation workers, and Oregon’s largest Latino organization.We are hoping to garner enough community support to be able to work with Carmen to create a set of powerful  images to take back to the Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste.

May 5th: For the Santa Ana Art Walk:  We are also excited to announce a collaborative effort with a group called Evoke Unity. We will work together to activate the What is Democracy? storefront space and to engage the community. We met this dynamic young group of artists at  California State Fullerton 8th Annual Social Justice Summit called Unite to Rise Above Apathy

Evoke Unity, is a grassroots project developed by undergraduates from the Art Department of the College of the Arts, was created to discuss cultural diversity and identity among today’s students. This installation brings to light that our campus population is made up of students from over 80 nations. Evoke Unity hopes to convey that our success as a university community is due in large measure to these diverse backgrounds and perspectives.

Saturday, May 12th – 3:30 to 5
A big ThankYyou goes out to Bonnie Joy Massey. Thank you for asking us to particpate”
Grand Central Art Center,125 N Broadway.Santa Ana CA 92701
Speakers:”Successes and Failures of Democratic Social Movements in South Africa.”Alan Emery, Assistant Professor of Sociology at CSUF “Reviving the Left.” Steve Jobbit, Assistant Professor of History at CSUF.
Stop by and participate in What is Democracy? an art project developed by artist Jules Rochielle. Record your opinions and your story about the meaning of democracy today.

May 17-May 21: The Open Engagement Conference in Portland Oregon:
Jules Rochielle and the (SPAN)Social Practices Art Network will be part of this years Open Engagement 2012. The residency has allowed time to be made available for some more of the archived interviews to be produced to share through a presentations at Open Engagement. We are also trying to co-write a short essay along with John Spiak for a publication that will emerge out of this convening.

Open Engagement is an international conference that sets out to explore various perspectives on art and social practice and expand the dialogue around socially engaged art making. The Open Engagement conference is an initiative of Portland State University’s Art and Social Practice MFA concentration. Directed and founded by Jen Delos Reyes and planned in conjunction with the Art and Social Practice students, this year’s conference features keynote presenters Tania Bruguera, Shannon Jackson, and Paul Ramirez Jonas. The work by these artists and scholars touch on subjects including politics, economies, education, and representation.

Student Voices at What Is Democracy?


On April 21,2012: Today a group of students gathered for a diversity conference just stopped by to tell a few stories about youth and democracy.http://www.mcnc.us/professional-development/student-leadership-initiative/ —  at What Is Democracy, Grand Central Art Center.

Here is what they said about the word “democracy”

Beyond May…..well we have accomplished this much between March 6th and April 19th. There are many things currently being discussed with various community stakeholders in Santa Ana and we will post again as soon as we gain clarity about future activities.


Jules Rochielle: Portable City Project’s Artist in Residence @ GCAC

March 2, 2012

Jules Rochielle:
Portable City Project’s Artist in Residence
@ Grand Central Art Center
March – May 2012

With artist collaborative partners:
Carmen Montoya
Paige Tighe
Christina Sanchez
“Owen Driggs” – Janet Owen Driggs and Matthew Owen Driggs
Silvia Mantilla Ortiz
Jamie Crooke
Yevgeniya Mikhailik

During this initial phase of Jules Rochielle’s Grand Central Art Center Artist in Residence, the artist will be inviting several other artists to share her residency in order to create a “think tank” that will allow the team much needed time and space for collaborative artistic research. This time spent together creates the potential for the collaborative design of a larger collaborative project.

The creative team will use models of community-based research, public outreach, interviews, community resource mapping and community building to investigate the topics of work, labor, food and immigration. The discoveries made during the research residency will be presented in the form of a web-based archive and this information will be used to launch a larger collaborative project. The group of artists involved in the initial stage of this residency and the creation of this “think tank” will be:

Jules Rochielle
Carmen Montoya
Christina Sanchez
Paige Tighe
Owen Driggs
Silvia Mantilla Ortiz
Jamie Crooke
Yevgeniya Mikhailik

The time and space offered through this residency platform will also allow Jules Rochielle structured editing time to refine her archive of interviews collected through (SPAN) The Social Practice Art Network. These interviews will be transcribed and they will be presented to a broader audience at Open Engagement 2012. During this event, the artist Jules Rochielle will continue to interview the community of socially engaged artists forming at Open Engagement 2012.

Additional Links:

Social Practice Art Network
Open Engagement

About the Collaborators:

Jules Rochielle has held artist residencies at LACE (Los Angeles), Knowles West Media Center, (Bristol UK) and with The Sequoia Parks Foundation, (Visalia, CA). In March 2012, she will be in residency at Grand Central Art Center, Cal State University Fullerton (Santa Ana, Ca). In May 2012 she will present her work at Open Engagement in Portland, Oregon. Recently selected to participate in Creative Times’ Living as Form, the Social Practice Archive. Founder of (SPAN) the Social Practices Art Network, and Portable City Projects and a co-founder of Miscellaneous Productions. Also a consultant that specializes in community arts, community organizing and non-profit sector issues. She has worked with the following groups and organizations: Native Public Media, Public Art Review, Metabolic Studio / Farmlab, Otis College of Art and Design, Freewaves, Access to Media Education Society, Vancouver Moving Theatre/Heart of the City Festival, Full Circle First Nations Performance, Vancouver International Fringe Festival.

Maria del Carmen Montoya is a new media artist working in performance, sculpture and installation. Her studio practice explores the personal, emotional and utterly irrational tendencies of technology. In 2009 she was awarded the prestigious Rhizome Commission for New Media for I Sky You, an installation wherein the quiet of a room is intermittently broken by erratic bursts of chemically synthesized light and electronically generated resonant tones. Her ongoing international collective, Ghana ThinkTank, was shortlisted for the Cartier Award and won the Creative Time Open Door Commission in 2011. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally including SIGGRAPH, PERFORMA, State X New Forms, New Museum Festival of Ideas, ZKM | Museum of Contemporary Art, and Visiones Sonoras in Morelia, Mexico where she cofounded an artist residency program for multimedia performance art. She holds a Masters Degree in Digital Media from Rhode Island School of Design.

Christina Sanchez was born in Woodland, a farming town in California’s central valley. In 2002, she completed her undergraduate degree in Studio Art from San Francisco State University. From 2002 to 2010 she worked at a small inner-city private school in Oakland, California. During that time, Christina took on various roles: she taught Kindergarten, mentored teachers, served as Vice Principal, and organized the school’s first art program from the ground up. She now lives in Los Angeles and will receive her Masters in Fine Arts in Public Practice from the Otis College of Art and Design in May 2012.In 2011, Christina initiated the Break/Pausa project as a dialogical investigation into the lives of immigrant restaurant workers living in Los Angeles. In particular, Break/Pausa is aimed at engaging the most hidden and marginalized people of this workforce: Back-of-House workers. Through informal interviews, performative interventions, and partnerships with advocacy organizations, the project seeks to uncover and archive worker histories as well as raise public awareness about pertinent workers rights and quality of life issues.

Tighe Paige is currently exploring the boundaries of public and private meditation with a concentration in disruption. This manifests in her collaborations in postmodern dance with Christine Suarez and the mentoring of Hana von der Kolk. She has danced at MOCA, beaches, the Hammer, public parks, buses, and RedCat. She is a part of Pedestal & the All Girl Band that is a mobile karaoke unit and a public art persona. Her favorite media are dancing and video, sometimes together, sometimes not. She is the inaugural post grad curatorial fellow at the Ben Maltz Gallery under the tutelage of Meg Linton. The artists received her MFA in Public Practice from OTIS College of Art and Design in 2010.

Silvia Mantilla Ortiz is a transnational individual with constantly expanding roots. Her notions of home and belonging continuously swell in order to include the many places where a piece of her being resides; these include Bogotá, Colombia; Edison, NJ; Providencia, Colombia; Williamstown, MA; Giron, Colombia; and now, Los Angeles, CA. The artist received her BA from Williams College, Cum Laude and is currently a MFA Public Practice Candidate at Otis College of Art and Design.

“Owen Driggs” is the collective identity of Matthew Driggs and Janet Owen. Individually experienced artists, educators and curators, Janet and Matthew began their professional collaboration in 2007, after the spectacular success of their first major work, their son Theo. Together, as Owen Driggs, their practice focuses on the production of space and the impact of spatiality on action and discourse.

Janet Owen Driggs is a writer, artist and curator who has exhibited her work internationally, including in the United States, Europe, Scandinavia and Brazil. She has curated exhibitions and screening programs in the United Kingdom, United States, People’s Republic of China and Mexico. A member of the Metabolic Studio team, Janet is the editor of “Not A Cornfield: History/Site/Document”. Her writings have been published most recently in: Artillery, ArtUS, Strawberry Bulletin, The Guardian, and Art Review , in addition to the volumes “How Many Billboards? Art In Stead”, “Hammer Projects 1999-2009”, and “Heike Baranowski – Kolibri”.

Matthew Owen Driggs is an artist, curator and educator, Matthew Owen Driggs lives and works in Los Angeles. Previously Exhibition Designer at the University of Southern California’s Fisher Museum, and a curator at both RAID Projects and Edward Giardiana Contemporary Art, Matthew is currently an adjunct professor at Cypress College. His work has been exhibited at national and international venues including: Kyubidou Gallery, Tokyo, Japan; Vegabond, Palmer, Alaska, USA; MOP (Modes of Production) Sydney, Australia; Cynthia Broan, New York, NY, USA; Laguna Beach Museum of Art, Laguna Beach, CA, USA; and Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Jamie Crooke is an artist working in the discipline of fine arts through project-based artworks that are participatory in nature, which utilize performance, installation art, drawing, social sculpture and event planning as formats for her artwork. She currently has two on-going projects that exist online, through art objects and performative events: Save Yourself and Pulse and Parcel. Her artwork is reflective of value and worth, as seen through her service-based model in many of her projects. Some areas of investigation include the intersection of interior body space and exterior constraints, be it land, policy or social services. Throughout her projects she aims to create cathartic moments of relief and reflection for individuals and the collective through the use of pedagogical models, poetics and public practice.

Yevgeniya Mikhailik was born and raised in Russia and relocated to the US in 2000. She is currently working on her MFA in Illustration at California State University, Long Beach. She has exhibited at the CSULB Art Museum, Gallery Nucleus, Grand Central Art Center, Phone Booth Gallery, The Box, Hibbleton, and the CSULB art galleries. Yevgeniya’s work as been on the pages of local and international publications, online publications and blogs.

Information on the Grand Central Art Center Artist in Residence initiative can be found at:
https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/artist-in-residence-program/