Another Successful Imagination Celebration @ GCAC!

April 14, 2014

Each year, Grand Central Art Center participates in the month long, countywide celebration of the arts, Imagination Celebration.

The overall countywide program is presented by Arts Orange County and the Orange County Department of Education, with each individual venue organizing their own contributions through visual, performing and creative arts activities.

GCAC’s contribution took place this past Saturday, April 12, a day of free hands-on workshops.

This year was another grand success, with individuals of all ages participating in the activities.  

Here is a little recap of the days activities: 

Ryman

Drawing activities with Ryman Arts

MASKA

Hands-on art activities with MASKA

facepainting

Face painting with Cynthia Mann

handson

Zines / bookmaking with Ivy Leighton and Maxwell Rivas

zines

Printmaking and collage techniques with Elise Bernal

flamenco

Flamenco dancing with Claudia de la Cruz

buttons

Button making with Tracey Gayer

Activities of Imagination Celebration continue through May 25 at sites throughout Orange County, so check the calendar for upcoming activities:  http://www.sparkoc.com/categories/index/14/379

 


CUMULUS: MATTHEW MOORE AND BRADEN KING

September 27, 2013

MARKING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT

Residency: June 2013 – December 2013

Exhibition: October 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014
 
OPENING RECEPTION: October 5 from 7-10pm 
 
 

Major support provided by the Metabolic Studio and Casio LampFree Projectors:

sm metabolicsm casio


moore king detail

Grand Central Art Center has invited Matthew Moore and Braden King as artists in residence to explore, examine and reflect upon the impact of the Los Angeles Aqueduct – part of a sixteen institution initiative funded through the Metabolic Studio’s Chora Council grants, marking the LA Aqueduct’s 100TH anniversary.

Cumulus marks the first collaboration between these two accomplished artists.  Through the residency, the artists set out on journeys – a series of driving trips along the aqueduct.  They connected with people who work, live and engage along its path.  Their travels allowed them the opportunity to listen to the land and then the water as it rushed down the cascade near Newhall Pass; flowed through massive piping in the Antelope Valley; traversed under slabs of concrete through the Mohave Desert; diverted from the Owens River.

The journey of water is not a foreign concept to artist Matthew Moore; it is actually central to generations of his family’s livelihood.  For without the control of water, it would have been impossible for Moore to become the fourth generation of farmers in his family, sowing land in what would otherwise be considered hostile desert environment of western Phoenix, Arizona.

Through his agricultural history, Moore found his artistic voice.  He uses his creative practice to explore issues of place and ecology.  The foundation of his approach come from the realization that the actions of taking the desert, converting it into arable land by diverting water, creates an infrastructure that provides the perfect environment for urban growth and suburban sprawl, which are inherently complex and problematic.

Working in the medium of film and installation, Braden King’s projects often focus on individuals finding their place in the world and how external geographies can act as mirrors to our internal selves – mapping, landscape, geography, work. To quote Zachary Wigon’s in Filmmaker Magazine (Apr 11, 2012) regarding King’s 2011 film HERE, “is about nothing so much as having an appreciation and understanding of where one is.”

King approaches his art through his personal desires of seeing something in the world and then making that thing a reality.  It’s an attempt to make a little more order in the world, both his own and that of others.

The site-specific installation Cumulus is a culmination of a residency that allowed for multiple site visits, time to talk, and time to travel outside the institution.  To quote King “It’s been a truly creative collaboration and process – feeling our way into something, not thinking our way into something.” The project is an attempt to tell the story of this 100-year old engineering marvel that was dedicated on Nov. 5, 1913, when thousands gathered northeast of Los Angeles to mark the opening.  A ceremony where Chief Engineer and Aqueduct designer William Mulholland remarked, “There it is. Take it!”

Constructed to transport water from the Owen’s Valley in its first phase, and later from the Mono Basin in its second.  The 373 mile long LA Aqueduct created a rich environment for growth in Southern California, while leaving a virtual dust bowl in the central part of the State.

Cumulus addresses the “it” of the aqueduct and Mulholland’s statement.  What is the “it” that we may be taking and what does “it” enable us to achieve?  Is the “it” simply water that has run down from the Sierra’s, or does it reflect someone’s real or potential prosperity and livelihood?  What impact does “it” have on landscape? And most significantly, how much control do we actually have over “it”?

Through the use of building materials, specifically used scaffolding planks, the artists have created a massive pipeline that emerges from one side of the gallery before quickly disappearing into the other.  Projected upon it are moving images of atmosphere and landscape, traversing its surface as fluidly as water flows through the aqueduct itself.  The installation reflects our inherent curiosity, of being fascinated by the things humans decide to make.  To quote Moore, “the audacity of the human endeavor is never more apparent than when societies come together to construct such industrial feats as the aqueduct, achieving a perceived common good.” At the same time, such achievements acknowledge our limits of control as makers, as much as we desire to do so.

From Moore’s direct experience of water in agriculture, “to believe in it as a certainty is inherently flawed.  We can build all the infrastructure and systems to transport this precious resource, but if it doesn’t rain, they are all for naught.”  He continues, “there may be no more hopeful image than that of a cloud… the promise of sustenance and a future that cannot be controlled by the will of man.”

To quote King, “The Aqueduct made it possible for a lot of things to exist.  Los Angeles wasn’t there, and then it was there, which again has made the success of Orange County possible.  People thought, ‘Hey, we can take that water from up here, and make a channel and take it down there, across the desert, and then we can make more things and more people can live.’  And then they did it.  They turned clouds into concrete.”

Major support provided by the
Metabolic Studio (http://www.metabolicstudio.org/)
Casio LampFree Projectors (http://www.casioprojector.com/).

sm metabolicsm casio

Programming and Projection System Design: Brian Chasalow
CAD/Architecture Support: Aaron Forbes
Project Assistance: Catherine Mahoney, Kim Larkin, Tracey Gayer
Installation: Claes Bergman, James Sulak, Matthew Miller
Promotional Assistance: Yevgenia Mikhailik, Shauna Hultgrien
Gallery Assistance: Maxwell Rivas, Tony Pedraza, Angelica Perez

More information regarding the Metabolic Studio Chora Council grant can be found online at:http://www.annenbergfoundation.org/node/50769


Saskia Jorda Wraps First Part of Residency

March 29, 2013

It has been a busy few months for artist in residence Saskia Jorda, who has been at Grand Central Art Center engaging the topic of quinceañera with our local community, with assistance of CSUF BFA student Angelica Perez-Aguirre.  She’s met with numerous individuals and groups, spent time in great conversations, has had generous collaborative assistance from many members of our Santa Ana neighborhood, as well as CSUF faculty, students and our GCAC team.  The collective efforts and energy are working towards the development of her project that will open in GCAC’s Don Cribb Project Room during the May 4, Downtown Santa Ana First Saturday Art Walk.

Saskia Jorda with Angelica Perez-Aguirre

Saskia Jorda with Angelica Perez-Aguirre

Saskia Jorda with Joanna Roche and Matthew Miller

Saskia Jorda with Joanna Roche and Matthew Miller

Over the course of the past few weeks, Saskia had the opportunity to speak at the contemporary art history class of CSUF professor Joanna Roche.  She welcomed students from Joy Shannon’s art classes of the Orange County School of the Arts into the Artist in Residence studio to share her past work and a conversation about the recent project.  CSUF students Aaron Jones,   and Maxwell Rivas joined community member Claudia de la Cruz for Saskia’s second Sunday Workshop and Conversation.

Saskia Jorda with Angelica Perez-Aguirre, Maxwell Rivas, Aaron Jones and members of the community.

Saskia Jorda with CSUF students Angelica Perez-Aguirre, Maxwell Rivas, and community member Claudia de la Cruz.

Saskia Jorda with Joy Shannon's students from Orange County School of the Arts

Saskia Jorda with Joy Shannon’s students from Orange County School of the Arts

Saskia Jorda with Joanna Roche and Tracey Gayer

Saskia Jorda with Joanna Roche and Tracey Gayer

Saskia has concluded the first part of her residency, but will return in late April for the installation of the project.   We thought you might enjoy this little teaser of the full installation to come, it will be fantastic!  Mark your calendar now and plan to join us, we promise lots of outstanding art and a few surprises…

7a


Season Opening (9/1) & Performance Recap (8/24) @ Grand Central Art Center

August 27, 2012

It’s starting, the kick-off of our 2012-2013 season of exhibitions, programs and engagement at Grand Central Art Center.  With our new Director arriving last September 6, it has been a year in transition.  We have been busy the past 12-months developing a season that kicks-off September 1st from 7-10pm, with a free Season Opening Reception of three new and exciting exhibitions – Tony de los Reyes: Border Theory; Constantin Hartenstein: Event Horizon; and Erin Morrison: Meditative Action.

Tony de los Reyes: Border Theory

Constantin Hartenstein: Event Horizon

Erin Morrison: Meditative Action

Actually, we kicked-off the season a little early, with a pre-season performance last Friday, August 24.  Through the generous support of swissnex San Francisco, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, the City and Canton of Geneva, and a collaborative partnership with LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions), we presented Yann Marussich’s Bleu Remix, with sound performance by Steve Roden and Glenn Bach.  The evening provided a unique opportunity to experience this Swiss artists intriguing work.

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich. Photo Credit: Maxwell Rivas

Current CSUF students, LACE Director Carol Stakenas, Allen Moon of David Lieberman Artists’ Representative, UCR Sweeney Art Gallery Associate Curator and ARTSblock educator Jennifer Frias, among many others, attended the performance. Joanna Roche, Professor and Program Coordinator of Art History at California State University, Fullerton, sent, via email to Grand Central Art Center, a wonderful thank you that included an unsolicited text regarding her experience which she has given us permission to share:

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich. Photo Credit: Maxwell Rivas

“It is with great intention and little pretension that Yann Marussich chooses blue for his performance. In Bleu Remix, Marussich reclines motionless within his heated box, sometimes staring, sometimes with eyes closed, exuding blue. Steve Roden and Glenn Bach’s sound performance Friday night at the Grand Central Art Center was the aural partner to Marussich’s body. Roden and Bach’s sound activates us within the space of the gallery, moving with us around the clear box that contains the artist. But the sound, like the artist’s body, takes us to another place. I’m not sure where it is, but it’s an intense, yet deeply still dimension. I guess it’s a blue place…

Steve Roden and Glenn Bach – Sound Performance

After his 45-minute performance, I asked Yann if his choice of blue was linked to sadness or melancholy (lamentation was a feeling I couldn’t escape watching tears of blue roll from lids to cheeks to chest in two blue streams into the pool of his navel). “No sadness, only presence—just for you [his audience],” he replied with a smile that revealed pale blue teeth. Yann Marussich’s body in Bleu Remix is not the “blue skin of cold,”[1] but a hot blue offering of self and sweat and sincerity.”

Joanna Roche
Professor and Program Coordinator, Art History
California State University, Fullerton
August 24, 2012

[1] For lovers of blue, read William Gass’s On Being Blue: A Philosophical Inquiry (Boston: Godine, 1976), 29.

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich. Photo Credit: Maxwell Rivas

The evening was capped off with a wonderful dinner at local eatery Memphis at the Santora, where the artist, his family and his team, the sound artists, swissnex San Francisco team, and individuals from LACE, joined us for conversation and talk of future collaborative opportunities.

Dinner @ Memphis

As you will see from the 2012-2013 Exhibition / Program Schedule, this energy will continue throughout the upcoming year.  We have planned a quality and diverse season that will continue to provide inspiration and engagement for our communities – including CSUF students, faculty and staff; our Santa Ana community; and our contemporary arts communities locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.  We will be collaborating with a wide range of community partners, from the Santa Ana Public Library, the Grain Project, MKE<->LAX, Quinceañera Magazinebulbo (Tijuana/Los Angeles), OC Film Fiesta, among many others.

We look forward to seeing you here at Grand Central Art Center throughout the year and especially this Saturday, September 1st, as we invite you to celebrate with us.  It should be a wonderful evening among friends, colleagues, students and community, and a fantastic way to begin the new season!