INTERNal Affairs: Once Bitten

October 7, 2013

INTERNal Affairs is a series by GCAC Curatorial Intern and CSUF Art History major Shauna Hultgrien.

It’s spreading. Fast and unapologetic, the Creative bug is buzzing and has struck the arts community of Santa Ana. I’ve been on the front line here at Grand Central Art Center for just a few months now, but in that time I have seen artists turned mad with ingenuity and innovation, hardly able to contain their creative impulses; once the Creative bug bites the virus seems to run rampant through its host. After experiencing October’s first Saturday Art Walk, it has become abundantly clear that this outbreak has viciously begun to affect the arts community at large. The symptoms by which this virus manifests itself are as diverse and varied as the artists themselves. It is still unclear as to how this creativity spreads: is it contact? Is it airborne? Is it something in the water? Perhaps it’s some sort of contamination of the food? As you know, my Internet friends, I am no doctor; no, I am simply GCAC’s humble intern and your loyal reporter, so let’s take this time to review the evidence together and get to the bottom of this epidemic.

Eamonn1
(Eamonn Fox performing with Jenny)

I did my best to expect the unexpected during October’s Art Walk. I realize that this is the month of mischief and mayhem, so I kept an open mind and a watchful eye for anything out of the ordinary. This proved to be an arduous task; the last three months GCAC has happily facilitated artist Eamonn Fox, and for those of you who have experienced Fox and/or his work can sympathize when I say, it has become increasingly difficult to distinguish the ordinary from the extraordinary. I have somehow seemed to normalize absurdity and thusly am phased by very little. This speaks volumes to my bewilderment that was to occur on Saturday, but I’m getting ahead of myself, let’s start from the beginning.

beatriz1
(Beatriz Cortez with patron)

telethon 1
(The Eternal Telethon: The Power Suit Edition)

beatriz3
(Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine)

telethon 2
(The Eternal Telethon: The Power Suit Edition)

beatriz 2 w king
(Braden King viewing Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine)

So, it began like any other art walk, eager patrons strolling in to GCAC to get their last glimpse of Beatriz Cortez’s The Time Machine, and Eamonn Fox’s Solo Residency Exhibition for the Purposes of Furthering My Career, as well as to witness the unveiling of Cumulus, the newest installation in the main gallery by Matthew Moore and Braden King. Fox decided to take full advantage of his last art walk here with us by using his space to host The Eternal Telethon, a telethon for the 21st century organized by artist Jen Bruce, with Paul Michael White Jr., Niko Solorio, Alexis Disselkoen and Marcos de la Siref. Artists of varying talents took turns in front of the crowd and in front of the webcam (the telethon was streaming live on the internet), showcasing their skills for our enjoyment. This was the first indicator that the Creativity virus was spreading; artists from San Diego to Bakersfield turned out to plug in to this artistic outlet. There were musical acts, comedy routines, performance pieces, and two lively MCs that seamlessly supplemented the show. The inundation of artists and their passion for their craft indicated that they had not escaped the clutches of the Creative bug. Upon noticing this, my concern for the patrons grew. Not wanting to alarm anyone at a potential infestation of creativity here at GCAC, I carefully and quietly scanned the masses for signs of the Creativity bug. The crowd persisted through the Telethon in its entirety, excusing themselves occasionally to take their turn in The Time Machine or to gasp in awe at the enormously impressive Cumulus. All seemed well, until I saw it. I caught a glimpse of a patron’s eye and there it was, that glimmer of craze. I knew they had caught the bug; a sort of benign rabidity that propelled them through the galleries until their creative appetites were satisfied hastened their movements.

moore king 1
(Cumulus: Matthew Moore and Braden King)

memphis
(CSUF student exhibition at Memphis)

moore king 4
(Cumulus: Matthew Moore and Braden King)

The glow of the perfectly formatted projections on to the wooden reconstruction of the LA Aqueduct emanated from the gallery that houses Cumulus, or what King calls, “ 50 feet, 6,000 pounds, and18,000 lumens of awesome.” Feeling overwhelmed by the artistic greatness housed in GCAC and by the realization that the Creative virus is much bigger that I had initially suspected, I ran into the promenade for some fresh air, but that crazed look was in nearly everyone’s eyes! The vendors, the street performers, the passerby’s; in a dazed panic I stumbled towards the nearest illuminated room and found myself in the Memphis of Santora’s Backdoor Gallery. The modest gallery, donated by artist, curator and CSUF/GCAC MFA alum David Michael Lee, has become the new home to the works of some of Cal State University Fullerton’s students. Curator, featured artist, and GCAC MFA resident Caesar D. Alzate Jr. assured me that this was to be the first of many shows that would take place in the space. I was happy to meet our neighbors, but it only confirmed my fears that this Creative bug had spread past GCAC’s walls and was now beyond anyone’s control.

moore king detail
(Cumulus: Matthew Moore and Braden King)

tony 1
(Artist Tony de los Reyes)

group1
(Desiree and Greg Glenn, Jim Skuldt, Jesse Sugarmann and his wife Erica)

mules3
(Mary Leigh Cherry with her son and daughter, and artist Lauren Bon with one of her project’s promotional mules)

c4 1
(Artists Matthew Moore, Braden King, Micol Hebron, Carrie Marill, Jesse Sugarmann, Tony de los Reyes gather with program/projection system designer Brian Chasalow, Cherry and Martin gallery owner Mary Leigh Cherry, Filmmaker Alexa Sau, Sound Editor Borja Sau for post reception get together at C4)

My head spinning, I made my way back to GCAC where I ran into Matthew Moore and Braden King, who were both enjoying the opening of their remarkable installation, along with program/projection system designer Brian Chasalow and project assistant Kim Larkin. I knew that the Creative bug had bitten them all; it was abundantly evident in their work. Over the last month their condition never stabilized, it only intensified as the scope of their project seemed to abandon all boundaries until it eventually culminated into the fantastic creation that is Cumulus. It was then that I began to notice some familiar faces around the gallery and I realized then that I had been naïve to believe that the Creative epidemic had only been affecting Santa Ana. The return of Mary Leigh Cherry and Tony de los Reyes to the corridors of GCAC was a happy reunion after de los Reyes 2012 show in our gallery, but this also a red flag, the Creative bug was much more powerful than I anticipated. This was further confirmed when I noticed Creative Capital grantee artists, Jim Skuldt and Jesse Sugarmann bouncing between the galleries. King and Moore are also Creative Capital artists, so to have four under one roof was overwhelming to a young, impressionable intern such as myself. Artists Carrie Marill and Micol Hebron were roaming the spaces as well. The coup de gras, however, was when Lauren Bon parked her mules from her upcoming, 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct so that she could experience Cumulus, which stands as another homage to the centennial celebration of the LA Aqueduct. It was then that I came to a full realization that Creative bug cannot be contained; it’s indiscriminately hitting everyone and surfacing in the form of fantastically innovative works.

Aili1
(Aili Schmeltz: Cross Cut)

ragebear1
(Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome)

Tim Youd
(Tim Youd will be “Performing” A Scanner Darkly)

big draw
(Nov. 2, The Big Draw LA event at GCAC in collaboration with Ryman Arts)

vincent
(Vincent Goudreau – detail from The Juan Recordings: Migrating to the Senior Tour)

So that’s it Internet community, but I don’t know where this leaves us. After this recap of events, the only conclusion that I have reached is that no one is safe. I suppose my only advice is to enjoy it, because if you haven’t encountered the Creative bug yet, you soon will. Especially if you choose to join us on November 2nd for the first Saturday Art Walk when GCAC will continue Cumulus and open two new shows, Aili Schmeltz’s Cross Cut and Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome curated by MFA in Illustration student Marvin Chow. That evening will also mark the beginning of Tim Youd‘s month long “Performing” A Scanner Darkly and we’ll host a one night Big Draw LA event for the entire family with Ryman Arts throughout the evening. And did I mention, artist Vincent Goudreau arrives in residence this week from Maui and will be at GCAC for the next two months? Since contact with the Creative bug is inevitable, I suggest you welcome it with open arms and join us sooner rather than later here at GCAC. I hope that you come to your senses and embrace the madness because if you can’t beat them, join them. This is the GCAC intern, over and out.

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FALL SEASON PREVIEW – Grand Central Art Center

September 20, 2013

FALL SEASON PREVIEW
Exhibitions / Artist in Residence / Theatre

EXHIBITIONS

Adriana

 

 

 

 

Adriana Salazar: Nothing Else Left
2013 California-Pacific Triennial Partnership with Orange County Museum of Art
through September 22, 2013

Is there an end to our existence? Can we be separated from our bodies and be transformed into something else? Adriana Salazar’s work has continued to revolve around these questions in different ways. This is why the realm of mortuary customs appeals to her: it presents numerous ways to approach the ultimate unknown.

During a two-month residency at Grand Central Art Center, the artist desired to go deeper into that moment of transition between life and death, finding out as much as she could about what happens with our bodies, with our consciousness and with everything we build around the death of others. In her words, “I found, amongst other things, that there is an aesthetics of transition, that there are rituals trying to maintain life after death, and laws which govern our bodies, even when we are not fully present. I also found out that there are transitional techniques and an intricate industry around them.”

Salazar has decided to rescue as many cremated artificial body parts possible. These parts remain as solid as they were inside their bodies and are nevertheless considered residue. She found their value in this very ambiguity. They embody the question of the status of our own existence on a physical level: their materiality creates confusion between those objects as parts of a physical body and our own body, thus opening the gap between our certainties and uncertainties, beyond the matter of human death itself.

Beatriz

 

 

 

 

Beatriz Cortez: The Time Machine
through October 13, 2013

The Time Machine is an installation that explores the dual realities of a first world metropolis, Los Angeles, and of urban space in a developing region of the world, in this case San Salvador. These spaces coexist in the same hemisphere, separated by over 2,300 miles. However, they have strong connections to one another through labor and culture. Los Angeles is home to the largest Salvadoran population outside of the capital city of San Salvador.

Cortez’s work explores memory and loss in the aftermath of a war and in relation to the experience of immigration. Her installation conveys the experience of an immigrant who lives in Los Angeles, but who simultaneously inhabits another reality, that of one’s own city of origin. As a result, the installation makes reference to a landscape of diverse layers, the superimposition of two urban realities. The outside wall of the room displays a video projection of the City of Los Angeles in the daylight, viewed from the Griffith Observatory. The inner space of The Time Machine, on the contrary, is dark and shows a view of the city of San Salvador at night. It is a space reminiscent of childhood and nostalgic memories – a childhood of an artist who was raised during a war torn period in Salvadoran history.

Eamonn

 

 

 

 

Eamonn Fox: Solo residency exhibition for the purposes of furthering my career
through October 13, 2013
Performance: October 5 from 7-10pm

Eamonn Fox solo residency exhibition… is a real time adventure in art making. The artist approaches the exhibition opportunity as a fluid series of related events, as opposed to an exercise in the arrangement of static objects. Featuring sculpture, photography, printmaking, painting, and performance in a bizarre and unpredictable rotation – the artist hopes to engage audiences on a personal level, one individual at a time. Taking time away from his day-job, Fox plans to be in “residence” and on site during gallery hours (as much as possible) to collaborate with patrons, field questions or perhaps play darts. Without a discernable strategy in terms of “big picture” meaning making, content is variable and specific to individual works. As fleeting, fast and dynamic as contemporary life is, the exhibition aims to be an enlivened site of exchange – nimble enough to adapt to news items, world events and local engagement through the constant development/arrival of un-predetermined artworks and programming.

matthew braden

 

 

 

 

Matthew Moore and Braden King: Cumulus
Residency/Exhibition with support of the Metabolic Studio
October 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014
Opening Reception: October 5 from 7-10pm

The journey of water is not a foreign concept to artist Matthew Moore; it is actually central to generations of his family’s lively hood. For without the control of water, it would have been impossible for Moore to become the fourth generation of farmers in his family, sowing land in what would otherwise be considered hostile desert environment of western Phoenix, Arizona.

Through his artistic practice, Moore has found his artistic voice, while at the same time coming to a realization – the actions of taking raw desert/native land, converting it into fertile farming land by diverting water, and creating infrastructures, actually provides the perfect environment for suburban sprawl to occur. He also realized that his practice of farming this land might actually exploit more natural resources than the subdivisions he was so quick to criticize.

Matthew Moore has invited filmmaker/artist Braden King to collaborate through residency at Grand Central Art Center. They have spent time traveling the LA Aqueduct route from Central to Southern California. Along the way they’ve reflecting upon its impact, connecting and having conversations with individuals who live, work and engage this structure on daily bases. Informed by these experiences, the artists will create a major site-specific installation, marking the aqueduct’s 100th anniversary on November 5, 2013.

Major funding support for this project provided by Metabolic Studio.

Tim

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Youd: “Performing” A Scanner Darkly
Throughout November 2013

Novelist Philip K. Dick lived the latter part of his life, and died, in Santa Ana. During his time in Santa Ana, he wrote some of his most highly acclaimed work. One of these late classics is A Scanner Darkly, a semi-autobiographical novel of drug use and paranoia set in a dystopian Orange County of the then near future (he wrote the novel in 1977, setting it in the mid 1990s).

Artist Tim Youd will “perform” A Scanner Darkly over the course of a 2 to 4 week period in the Grand Central Art Center lobby as part of his new series of novel/typewriter based work.

Aili

 

 

 

 

 

Aili Schmeltz: Cross Cut
November 2, 2013 – February 9, 2014
Opening Reception: November 2 from 7-10pm

Cross Cut, from Aili Schmeltz’s Tomorrowland series, explores the idea that utopia can be considered not only a place or a goal, but also as the very act of striving for such a target. Schmeltz’s hybridized structures are materializations, remnants of an ideal that never was and may never be. As fallen monuments to a utopic philosophy, they function as relics of both a “good place” and “no place.” Part architectural, part fossil, part potential: these works utilize discarded building materials that appear to have crystallized within a ‘natural’ process—strata that have undergone philosophical transformation yet to be fulfilled.

Marvin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rage Bear: Juggling Awesome
Organized by Marvin Chow, CSUF MFA in illustration
November 2, 2013 – February 9, 2014
Opening Reception: November 2 from 7-10pm

An exhibition representing both in-game artwork, concept artwork and fan artwork as it relates to Rage Bear – a concept involving a Bibi bear whose specialty juggling skills allow him to juggle ridiculous amount of objects when he gets angry. Through the invitation of Marvin Chow, 30 Los Angeles-based entertainment artists will develop work for the exhibition, creating part of the Rage Bear storyline in their own personal style.

Julianne Ken

 

 

 

 

 

Miracle Report: Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer
January 18 – May 11, 2014
Opening Reception: February 1 from 7-10pm

Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer spent their Social Studies residency at the Arizona State University Art Museum looking for miracles. The artists explored the miraculous through people’s perceptions of it in their lives, interviewing students, school children and community members of all ages and backgrounds. They combined their findings in an installation of fleeting vignettes playing on all of the available sound and video equipment in the museum’s possession. In the words of the artists, “Our installation will strive to embody some beauty, some hocus-pocus and some unexplainable magic.”

Initiated by John D. Spiak, this project was realized at the ASU Art Museum and supported by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts as part of the Social Studies series. Upon Spiak’s departure to accept his new position at Grand Central Art Center, Heather Sealy Lineberry curated the exhibition at ASU Art Museum with curatorial assistance from Nicole Herden.

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

(Cog•nate Collective) Amy Sanchez and Misael Diaz
Eamonn Fox
Matthew Moore and Braden King
Julianne Swartz and Ken Landauer
Holly Myers
Tim Youd
Vincent Goudreau
Daniel Tucker
Heather Layton and Brian Bailey

GRAND CENTRAL THEATRE

theatre

 

 

 

 

 

Fall Show #1 – ALMOST, MAINE
by John Cariani
Directed by Kari Hayter
The residents of and visitors to the tiny mythical town of Almost, Maine are falling in and out of love.
“An all encompassing globe of love: puppy love, hidden passion, love lost, burgeoning love, and many that fall in-between.” Amanda Gunther MD Theatre Guide
Performs 8pm 10/4, 10/5, 10/10, 10/11, 10/12, 10/16, 10/17, 10/18, 10/19
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#maine

Fall Show #2 – THE SUBMISSION
by Jeff Talbot
Directed by Mark Ramont
A raw, unsentimental play about race and gender exposing quiet prejudice and intolerance in the theatre.
“A mischievous dance across the minefield of affirmative action in the arts” David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter
Performs 8pm 10/25, 10/26, 10/31, 11/1, 11/2, 11/6, 11/7, 11/8, 11/9
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#submission

Fall Show #3 –ILLYRIA
Book, music, and lyrics by Pete Mills
Directed by Kari Hayter
Illyria is a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.
Performs 8pm 11/15, 11/16, 11/21, 11/22, 11/23 (dark Fall Break) 12/4, 12/5, 12/6, 12/7
Tickets: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html#cradle

MISSION

Grand Central Art Center is dedicated to the investigation and engagement of contemporary art and visual culture – regionally, nationallyand internationally – through unique collaborations between artists, students and the community.

SUPPORT
Grand Central Art Center programs are made possible with the generous support provided by:
Metabolic Studio
Efroymson Family Fund
William Gillespie Foundation
Fainbarg-Chase Families
Memphis at the Santora
An anonymous donor
The Yost Theatre
Memphis @ The Santora
Community Collaborative Partners

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER
Quality exhibitions, programs and outreach of Grand Central Art Center are made possible through the generous support of individuals like you.

MAKE A DONATION TODAY – Support GCAC for Continued Success!
Please call Tracey Gayer @ 714.567.7233

GALLERY HOURS
Closed Mondays and Holidays
Tuesdays – Sundays 11.00 am – 4.00 pm.
Extended hours: Friday & Saturday 11.00am – 7.00 pm.
(First Saturday of the month galleries are open until 10.00 pm)
http://www.grandcentralartcenter.com/maps.php

Thank you for your continued engagement and support!

Grand Central Art Center
a unit of Cal State University Fullerton’s College of the Arts
125 N. Broadway
Santa Ana, CA 92701
t. 714.567.7233
w. http://www.grandcentralartcenter.com
Blog. https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com
fb. https://www.facebook.com/pages/CSUF-Grand-Central-Art-Center/44510429914


Mat Gleason, Brent Green, Dan Cameron, Kip Pastor, Ruben Dario @ GCAC

October 18, 2012

We would like to thank everyone who has participated in programming over the past week here at Grand Central Art Center. It has provided another active schedule of diverse programming and wide range of visitors.

Last Thursday, Mat Gleason from Coagula (both the magazine and gallery) stopped by to see the exhibitions and chat a bit. We had the opportunity to talk about Tony de los Reyes, Constantin Hartenstein and Erin Morrison‘s work and the upcoming programming, before the conversation shifted to Angels baseball. Mat is one of the Angels number one fans, he actually pens for http://www.halosheaven.com/, but we won’t reveal his moniker, you’ll have to guess. The talk of baseball led to a great conversation about Adam Moser‘s residency/project this summer at GCAC, The Cut-Off Men. We honored Mat by presenting him with one of the team autographed, limited edition, baseballs from the project. Now if Mat would just stand still for one moment, we could get an in-focus picture…

Mat Gleason with Cut-Off Men autographed baseball


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friday afternoon, artist in residence Brent Green and his collaborators, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley and Jim Skuldt, met up at the Orange County School of the Arts, Margaret A. Webb Theatre. They spent much of the afternoon doing set-up and sound checks with the amazing OCSA team and volunteer students for that evenings screening with live soundtrack performance of Green’s feature film Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then. The venue is top notch and the sound quality was fantastic! After the sound check and a few warm-up runs, we headed down for a wonderful, pre-screening/performance, Mexican food dinner in downtown Santa Ana.

Sound check with Brent Green, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon and Jim Skuldt

Sound check with Brent Green, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon and Jim Skuldt

Sound check with Brent Green, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon and Jim Skuldt

Sound check with Brent Green, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon and Jim Skuldt

Sound check with Brent Green, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon and Jim Skuldt

Sound check with Brent Green, Tim Rutili, Tim Hurley, Mike McGinley, Jacquelyn Gordon and Jim Skuldt

Following the early dinner, it was time to head back to the theatre for the performance. There was a great audience who experienced a performance that was truly emotional, reflective and inspiring. It was a very moving evening of live music soundtrack and powerful film. Thank you Brent and your collaborators for creating such powerful art! Our sincere gratitude to the team at the Orange County School for the Arts, especially Aaron Orullian, Patrick Williams, Eric Hamme, Kevin Cook, Cathy Michaels. We are looking forward to future collaborations with your team, faculty and students!

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, screening with live performance @ OCSA Webb Theatre. Photo by Matthew Miller

Post performance conversation. Curator Cassandra Coblentz with artists Todd Gray, Kyungmi Shin and Joe Biel

The working week started of Monday with a visit from Orange County Museum of Art Chief Curator Dan Cameron. We invited Dan down to speak with students enrolled in the Exhibition and Design program at Cal State University Fullerton. Dan shared stories of how he began his career in the curating practice, his early travels to Spain that so inspired him, and his early writing on the topic of art. He talked about past projects, including his time at the New Museum, curating the 2003 Istanbul Biennale and the development of Prospect 1 in New Orleans. The students asked great questions and the conversation was lively. Thank you Dan for the time, energy and inspiration you provided to our students.

Orange County Museum of Art Chief Curator Dan Cameron

Monday evening, we partnered with OC Food Access Coalition, Positively Delicious OC and Memphis at the Santora to present a screening of the film In Organic We Trust. We had the great fortune to work with two wonderful individuals through this collaboration, OC Food Access Coalition Executive Director Gillian Poe and Program Coordinator Mire Molnar-Barton. We had an engaged crowd on hand that had the opportunity to talk with numerous organizations that set-up booths in our lobby, take in the tasty treats provided by Memphis, and enjoy the screening of the film. Following the film, the audience was provided the opportunity of a Q&A with the films Director/Producer Kip Pastor. It was an educational exchange that lasted close to an hour, with quality information provided by both the filmmaker and audience.

OC Food Access Coalition Event

OC Food Access Coalition Event

OC Food Access Coalition Event

Screening of In Organic We Trust

In Organic We Trust Director/Producer Kip Pastor during Q&A


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This afternoon, we were visited by Jose Quant and Shell Martin of the Q Art Salon, one of our great gallery neighbors here in Downtown Santa Ana. Jose and Shell brought Ruben Dario of Teatro Nacional Ruben Dario, Managua, Nicaragua, for a site visit to GCAC and conversation about cultural exchange possibilities. Lots of ideas and energy, so we will keep you posted as things develop.

Jose Quant of Q Art Salon, Ruben Dario of Teatro Nacional Ruben Dario, Managua, Nicaragua, and GCAC Director/Chief Curator John Spiak

Once again, we thank everyone who participated in our programming over the past week and look forward to providing more opportunities for community focused engagement in the coming days and months.

Lots of great GCAC programs, educational outreach, exhibitions and performance on the horizon!

WE LOOK FORWARD TO HAVING YOU JOIN US!


Season Opening (9/1) & Performance Recap (8/24) @ Grand Central Art Center

August 27, 2012

It’s starting, the kick-off of our 2012-2013 season of exhibitions, programs and engagement at Grand Central Art Center.  With our new Director arriving last September 6, it has been a year in transition.  We have been busy the past 12-months developing a season that kicks-off September 1st from 7-10pm, with a free Season Opening Reception of three new and exciting exhibitions – Tony de los Reyes: Border Theory; Constantin Hartenstein: Event Horizon; and Erin Morrison: Meditative Action.

Tony de los Reyes: Border Theory

Constantin Hartenstein: Event Horizon

Erin Morrison: Meditative Action

Actually, we kicked-off the season a little early, with a pre-season performance last Friday, August 24.  Through the generous support of swissnex San Francisco, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, the City and Canton of Geneva, and a collaborative partnership with LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions), we presented Yann Marussich’s Bleu Remix, with sound performance by Steve Roden and Glenn Bach.  The evening provided a unique opportunity to experience this Swiss artists intriguing work.

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich. Photo Credit: Maxwell Rivas

Current CSUF students, LACE Director Carol Stakenas, Allen Moon of David Lieberman Artists’ Representative, UCR Sweeney Art Gallery Associate Curator and ARTSblock educator Jennifer Frias, among many others, attended the performance. Joanna Roche, Professor and Program Coordinator of Art History at California State University, Fullerton, sent, via email to Grand Central Art Center, a wonderful thank you that included an unsolicited text regarding her experience which she has given us permission to share:

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich. Photo Credit: Maxwell Rivas

“It is with great intention and little pretension that Yann Marussich chooses blue for his performance. In Bleu Remix, Marussich reclines motionless within his heated box, sometimes staring, sometimes with eyes closed, exuding blue. Steve Roden and Glenn Bach’s sound performance Friday night at the Grand Central Art Center was the aural partner to Marussich’s body. Roden and Bach’s sound activates us within the space of the gallery, moving with us around the clear box that contains the artist. But the sound, like the artist’s body, takes us to another place. I’m not sure where it is, but it’s an intense, yet deeply still dimension. I guess it’s a blue place…

Steve Roden and Glenn Bach – Sound Performance

After his 45-minute performance, I asked Yann if his choice of blue was linked to sadness or melancholy (lamentation was a feeling I couldn’t escape watching tears of blue roll from lids to cheeks to chest in two blue streams into the pool of his navel). “No sadness, only presence—just for you [his audience],” he replied with a smile that revealed pale blue teeth. Yann Marussich’s body in Bleu Remix is not the “blue skin of cold,”[1] but a hot blue offering of self and sweat and sincerity.”

Joanna Roche
Professor and Program Coordinator, Art History
California State University, Fullerton
August 24, 2012

[1] For lovers of blue, read William Gass’s On Being Blue: A Philosophical Inquiry (Boston: Godine, 1976), 29.

Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich. Photo Credit: Maxwell Rivas

The evening was capped off with a wonderful dinner at local eatery Memphis at the Santora, where the artist, his family and his team, the sound artists, swissnex San Francisco team, and individuals from LACE, joined us for conversation and talk of future collaborative opportunities.

Dinner @ Memphis

As you will see from the 2012-2013 Exhibition / Program Schedule, this energy will continue throughout the upcoming year.  We have planned a quality and diverse season that will continue to provide inspiration and engagement for our communities – including CSUF students, faculty and staff; our Santa Ana community; and our contemporary arts communities locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.  We will be collaborating with a wide range of community partners, from the Santa Ana Public Library, the Grain Project, MKE<->LAX, Quinceañera Magazinebulbo (Tijuana/Los Angeles), OC Film Fiesta, among many others.

We look forward to seeing you here at Grand Central Art Center throughout the year and especially this Saturday, September 1st, as we invite you to celebrate with us.  It should be a wonderful evening among friends, colleagues, students and community, and a fantastic way to begin the new season!


Adam Moser, Cut-Off Men and MLB Tryout Results!

June 15, 2012

We know you have been waiting to hear results of the Major League Baseball tryouts, part of artist/athlete Adam Moser’s Social Practice residence here at Grand Central Art Center.

It’s been an extremely busy week, so we apologize for the delay.  Here is a breakdown of this week’s activities as they played out for Adam’s team, the Cut-Off Men.  Advance warning, this post is a bit long, but we think it’s worth every moment!

In our last blog post, the jerseys and Adam had arrived at Grand Central Art Center, the Cut-Off Men’s clubhouse and lockers were ready for the team’s arrival, and we were looking for one more teammate to fill out a nine-man roster.

On Sunday, Adam was invited by Cut-Off Men teammates Tori and Abraham to join them for one of their league games taking place at Pacifica High School in Garden Grove.   It was a beautiful Southern California day! Adam got a little time in the outfield and a couple of at bats, while Abraham was covering third and Tori at shortstop.  It was a great warm-up for the tryouts to come.

Monday evening, the team arrived early to meet their fellow teammates for the first time, as well as see their new lockers and jerseys (jerseys created by Victory Custom Athletic – thanks again to Claudette Duggan and the Victory team for helping us get these on such a short notice) before the Dutch Treat Dinner/Ball Signing event.  They brought with them their gear to store in their lockers, in preparation for Tuesday mornings early departure to the tryouts.

The team signed some baseballs for one another to get a little practice in before the public ball signing that evening.  They walked together, as a team, down Broadway to Izalco Salvadorian Cuisine on 5th Street, in Downtown Santa Ana.  Thank you to Fernando Valladares of Izalco for opening his restaurant to our team for this event!  Upon arrival, they were met at the restaurant by fans, friends and family.

At the restaurant, the team signed baseballs, met with their new fans, talked baseball and ate pupusas.  They bonded as a team, shared their thoughts about the next day’s tryouts and told stories of their history with the game.  As the night concluded, we headed back to the clubhouse with some of the teams news fans to share the space and further conversation. Before departing for good night sleeps, they tried on their jerseys on for the first time and we had the opportunity to take a more official first team picture.

Tuesday began early, as the team was scheduled to arrive at 6:45 a.m. to suit-up and catch the team van to the tryouts in Compton.  The team was very focused, prepping their gear, getting into their uniforms.  Our team documentarian/filmmaker and Grand Central Art Center current resident, Mickey Fisher, took the opportunity to interview team members to get their thoughts pre-tryouts.  When the team was ready, we met our van driver Rick and loaded the team van for departure.  We would like to THANK Stacy Wilkerson at Gold Coast Tours for all her assistance in helping us schedule a van on such short notice (as we mentioned previously, we just met Adam for the very first time at the Open Engagement Conference in Portland, OR.  On May 19, 2012, he first told us his idea for the project and we agreed to help him realize it).  Stacy, and our driver Rick, were a true pleasure to work with through this project.   And as it turns out, Rick’s brother is a major league scout for the San Francisco Giants, so we got to talk some baseball during the drive north to Compton.

We arrived at the MLB Urban Youth Academy, where Rick drove us right up to the main entrance with VIP service.  As most other individuals were there solo, you could tell immediately, coming as a team was drawing some attention.  The Cut-Off Men, with their team jerseys and van, created quite the buzz!  We could hear other attendees speculating out loud – “who is this team with such a dominant presence?”  The team listened up as instructions for the beginning of the day were delivered and waiver forms were handed out to over 500 individuals there to tryout.  So, like all the others, the Cut-Off Men filled out their forms and waited for further instructions.  Before things got too crazy, our documentarian/filmmaker Mickey took the opportunity to do a few more interviews with the wonderful backdrop of the ballpark.

Pitchers and catchers were instructed to go to one field, infielders and outfielders instructed to go to another.  For the pitchers, they were divided up by those who had previously played in the majors, those currently playing college ball or had played in the last year; and those who were playing in amateur leagues or hadn’t played recently.   On the opposing field, each position player formed into separate lines to receive their numbers.  Once the numbers were assigned, each position was called over by grouping to run their 60 yard dashes against the clock and one opponent.  The pitchers weren’t required to do the run, but more on their requirements later.

As the running continued, the position players on the team had a chance to warm-up their arms and stretch a bit, before all were told to head to the opposing field.  While the fielders had been running the 60 against the clock, the pitchers were showing their stuff on the mound.  The scouts didn’t tell the attendees directly, but it was clearly over heard from the viewing area –  righties that couldn’t throw at least 95mph weren’t being looked at, and lefties that could hit 88mph and had some movement would be considered.

Meanwhile, the position players were once again divided into outfielders and infielders, with infielders being separated further – second base, shortstop and third basemen in one area; and first basemen in another.  The outfielders were up first. Each was required to field fly balls, line drives and grounders, then give their best attempt to test their arms by throwing those fielded balls to a catcher behind home plate. If the scouts like what they saw on the first three attempts, the players would get a bonus ball.  Our only teammate trying out for outfield was Adam, so all eyes were on him.   As the Grand Central Art Center team looked on, Adam proceeded to make two great catches and charged to field one fast grounder.  He then threw each ball, with a gun of an arm, on a fly, straight into the catchers glove.  In an actual game, each of Adam’s throws would have been the perfect opportunity for the out at home.  So perfect was Adam’s fielding and throws, that he received a bonus ball, which he fielded to the same perfection!  With that complete, Adam was able to relax a bit and take in some of the action.

Next, the opportunity for the infielders to show their stuff.  The Cut-Off Men had the left infield covered, with the majority of the teammates playing shortstop and third base, and one trying out for second base.  Our guys looked great out there, fielding their grounders cleanly, charging those balls rolling fast on the infield grass and gunning their throws to first base.  There was a lot of confidence and pride on the field, and the Cut-Off Men proved they knew their way around a diamond.

After all second, shortstop and third base players had their opportunity to show their stuff, it was time for the first basemen skills to be tested.  As the Cut-Off Men were fielding no first basemen, this meant a little downtime, more bonding, sharing of experiences and lunch for the team.

The break didn’t last that long before all players were summoned to the infield for the announcement of who made the cut.  Of the 500 plus players in attendance, it was made clear at the beginning of the day, “dreams would be crushed.”  They were going to announce 40 numbers, which would be of the players who would move forward to play a simulated game on the field. They also made it clear that, of these 40 players, maybe one or two might be approached by a MLB scout at the event with a possible contract offer.  By the end of the announcement, it was clear that it was not the day for the Cut-Off Men; no one for the team would be making it to the big show.

These are the Cut-Off Men!  They are a team and they stand together with pride!  They were there supporting one another, bonding and talking about finding another nine guys who might be interested in a pick-up game.  They were making plans to play a game together this coming weekend.  They gave it their all and left everything they had on that field.  They were proud and able to hold their heads up high, knowing they had just experienced something together that no one could ever take away.

The team spent a few more hours taking in the remainder of the tryouts, watching young recruits give it their all in the hopes of making the next cut.  They shared stories from their  experiences – “the scout told me I was throwing in the mid-80s, which I could hardly believe I still had in me.  Then he told me I had two things going against me, my age and my velocity.”  Team members talked about the guys that they met throughout the day, those on the field with similar hopes and dreams.  It also provided the opportunity for documentarian/filmmaker Mickey to take some iconic shots to add to his footage.

As the tryouts were wrapping-up, we had an amazing chance encounter.  Yes, it was Major League Baseball scouting legend Phil Pote.  You know, the guy with a cameo in Moneyball that asks “Who’s Fabio?”  He is much more famous than that, as he’s been involved with Major League Baseball for over 50 years!  We struck up a conversation by asking whom he thought from today might make it to the big show, and through his answer he pointed at Adam and Erik and said, “you and you.”  OK, first he said that he doesn’t have a crystal ball and has no idea who might make it, since there are so many factors.  Then he said he could just look at guys and say “you and you”, but there is no guarantee.  He asked about our team name and Adam shared the project, talking about Social Practice and the community team he had built.   Phil was enthusiastic about the project and talked a bit of art with us, then told us how he had been playing in Major League Baseball all these years waiting for his acting career to take off.  He shared his amazing screenplay ideas and asked Adam to send him documentation and writing on the project when it was complete.  He handed us all his business card which has a giant “S” logo and reads: Seattle Mariners, Phil Pote, Advisor – Scout.  He introduced us to Ike Hampton, the Manager of the MLB Urban Youth Academy, who also played in the majors as a catcher for the New York Mets (1974), and later California Angels (1975-79).  If you get the opportunity, we highly recommend a trip out to Compton for a visit to the MLB Urban Youth Academy.   It is an outstanding facility and incredible service to the community!  Adam presented both Phil and Ike with a Cut-Off Men signed ball, before Ike had to get back to business.  Phil spent more time with us, as we proceeded to talk baseball with him for another 30-minutes.  His love and knowledge of the game was contagious, and his desire to keep the respect in the game was truly admirable.  Pete should be in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown!  As we wrapped things up, Phil said good bye by giving each of us a high-low-head-on fist bump, then jumped in his car and drove off.  Rick had arrived with the team van, so  it was time to load everything up and head back to Grand Central Art Center.

Upon arrival back at the team clubhouse, a little surprise was in store.  The team planned it perfectly, with Adam asking GCAC Director/Chief Curator John Spiak if he could see the photo we took with Phil Pote’s again.  As soon as Adam had the phone safe in hand, Abraham proceeded to provide Spiak with the traditional post game/victory drenching.  As there was no Gatorade or water cooler, water in a small trashcan would have to do.

It was time for the post tryout team dinner with family and friends.  We headed over to Memphis at the Santora for a celebration and hearty meal with a southern twist.    The dinner also provided an opportunity to celebrate Cut-Off Men Steven’s 25th birthday.  We sang out loud and shared in the glorious day.

Following dinner, we headed back to the clubhouse for the scheduled 7 p.m. press conference.  There, we met with the team from CTV3, who interviewed Adam.  They then handed the microphone to him so he could conduct interviews with his team.  Adam asked about the days experiences – What had been gained?  What had been learned?  How they were feeling?  The CTV3 team will share the coverage link of the story when it’s online, and we will share it with you!

As the team began to change out of uniforms and wind down their day, visitors entered the clubhouse and inquired about the project, including local Santa Ana CSI police officer and photographer, Leonard Correa.  It was at that moment we were able to shift the sports conversation, one which we had so carefully protected over the past three weeks, to a conversation about art.  We had been sharing the art conversation among the artist, his teammates and the GCAC staff over that same period, but publicly we only talked baseball.  Adam explained the workings of Social Practice, the relationships between the teammates and artist, the relationships between the world of baseball and the world of art.  They understood perfectly and shared their insights.  We had a fantastic exchange that included everyone, then we presented each visitor with an autographed team ball.  It was a perfect way to end such an outstanding experience!

So we know you are now asking, just how does this project relate to the workings of Social Practice?  What are the relationships between the teammates and artist? Are there really relationships between the world of baseball and the world of art?  Ponder that for a few days!  We’ve gone on too long with this post already, so we’ll share it in another entry to be posted soon.

The Cut-Off Men film can now be viewed online at: https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/2012/07/02/the-cut-off-men-filmdocumentary-now-online-for-viewing/