WE LOVE OUR CSUF AND SANTA ANA COMMUNITIES!

October 9, 2012

Weekends are busy at Grand Central Art Center and we have plans to keep it that way!

This past Saturday, we began our new series of panel and gallery talks to kick-off the Santa Ana Art Walk evenings.  At 5pm, we presented CONVERSATIONS WITH MASTERS: PANEL 1, a series of panels that place current Cal State University Fullerton MFA students working on degrees is specific medium or practice, in conversation with individuals currently successful in that practice, as well as in conversation with individuals who play a role in decision-making within that practice.

The first of this series focused on the practice of painting.  CSUF MFA in Painting, Sara Dehghan, lead the conversation with fellow panelists artist Tony de los Reyes (current GCAC exhibiting artist of Border Theory), and Deb Klowden Mann, owner of Gallery/KM in Santa Monica.  They talked about the current gallery structures, how to and how not to approach galleries in terms of representation, the struggles of post graduation for an artist, and much more.  The speakers were insightful, knowledgable and extremely generous through the conversation, setting the bar extremely high as this series continues.  The next panel is scheduled for Nov. 3 and will focus on the practice of Public Art, an announcement will be coming soon.  Thank you to Sara for preparing such fantastic lead questions and engaged follow-ups.  Thank you Deb and Tony for your time and energy, we know the audience truly felt rewarded.

At 6pm, we followed the panel with a gallery talk by GCAC exhibiting artist Erin Morrison, whose current exhibition Meditative Action is on exhibition in our Education Gallery.  Erin toured patrons through the exhibition, talking about each work in the show and sharing her insights into process, theory and vision for the overall work.  She shared insight into her current status as an MFA candidate at UCLA, her influences from both life and the artistic field, the growth of her current work, and her thoughts as the work moves forward.  A very inspiring talk, so please join us in thanking Erin for this opportunity to engage the work so deeply.

At the conclusion of Erin’s talk, it was time for the Art Walk activities.  The community joined us for the evening and the opportunity to see the exhibitions by Tony de los Reyes, Erin Morrison and the video installation Event Horizon by Constantin Hartenstein.  Many were on hand to see the exhibitions after reading the excellent review of Border Theory in the current edition of the OC Weekly.  We are thankful to Gustavo Arellano for such a positive review.

Along with the openings, we were joined onsite by individuals who are working with us to build an even stronger and healthier arts community.  Rebecca Tuynman and her team from Ryman Arts were on hand with a Wishing Tree drawing activity.  Grand Central Art Center and the CSUF College of the Arts have been in dialogue with Ryman over the past few month in development of a greater project, for which we hope to announce in the coming weeks, so please keep posted.

Claremont Graduate University Arts Management student Alē McGrew was here working on her cap-stone project, a semester long engagement research project involving Grand Central Art Center.  Alē is working with GCAC towards a better understanding of our audience, answering basic questions like:  Who is GCAC’s audience?  How does GCAC monitor and understand our audience behavior?  How does GCAC engage and cultivate their audience?  How can GCAC work to better serve our audience?  To date, the insights she has provided has been invaluable.

Saturday evening also marked opening weekend for this semesters Grand Central Art Center Theatre season.  Managed and programmed by CSUF’s Department of Theatre and Dance, the 85 seat black box theatre presents an outstanding series of programs annually.  The season kicked-off with a sell-out audience to Ordinary Day’s.  The musical will continue to run through October 20, so purchase your tickets now and find out about upcoming Grand Central Art Center Theatre offerings on the Department of Theatre and Dance website: http://www.fullerton.edu/arts/gcac/theatre.html

On Sunday, Grand Central Art Center hosted a Farmers Market community forum, organized and moderated by Delilah Snell of The Road Less Traveled.  A very diverse group of individuals came together to discuss the topic, past farmers markets in Santa Ana, structures that might need to be put into place to organize such a market, community groups whose voice should be at the table and the overall desire to get a Farmers Market in the Santa Ana community as rapidly as possible.  It was clear, there was true knowledge, diverse perspective and passion in the room, and it was wonderful to have the opportunity to receive such wonderful insight.  By the end of the meeting it was clear –  if we can all work together to put past issues aside and unite in positive ways, we can collectively create something amazing – that is what we at GCAC would love to see most of all. Then we believe the next step would be, a well organized, well respected, serving everyone, Farmers Market!  Thank you Delilah for making this happen and thank you to everyone who attended and provided feedback.

And throughout the day Monday, the sounds of drumbeats, piano, violin and clarinet are booming from our GCAC Theatre space, as artist in residence Brent Green and his collaborator Mike McGinley of Bitter Tears, work to develop and record the soundtrack for Green’s next feature film.  It is joyous and ambitious energy drifting through our walls, and we are so truly grateful to have these two extremely talented individuals among us.

Brent and Mike, along with Tim Rutili (Califone), Tim Hurley (Califone), Mike McGinley (Bitter Tears), Jacquelyn Gordon (artist), and Jim Skuldt (artist), will be performing the live soundtrack with Green’s feature length Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then this Friday, October 12 at 7pm.  The event is FREE TO ATTEND and is a collaborative presentation with the Orange County School for the Arts.  Complete details can be found on our blog at: https://grandcentralartcenter.wordpress.com/2012/10/04/brent-green-film-with-live-performed-soundtrack-oct-12-7pm/ 

WE LOVE BEING PART OF OUR CAL STATE UNIVERSITY FULLERTON AND SANTA ANA COMMUNITY!!!


SOC(i)AL: ART + PEOPLE – GCAC participating in free public series of roundtable discussions and weekend events

September 26, 2012
Grand Central Art Center is excited to be part of an outstanding series of roundtable discussions and weekend events taking place this fall.

Thank You to Anne Bray of Freewaves for instigated this series and the generous invitation extended to GCAC to participate!
Say passé to the sculpture in the square; the leading edge of public art is changing. Art is passing from isolation, to intervention, to participation, to engagement, to integration.SOC(i)AL: Art + People is a free, public series of roundtable discussions and weekend events. . .

that explores socially engaged art in Southern California from East to West.  Join the dialogue with SoCal artists, scholars, activists, and administrators as we think about socially engaged art in relation to zoning, technology, ethics, food, ritual, performance, gentrification, museums, democracy, nature and art support structures in the here-and-now.

Where is our collective dialogic imagination now?The series of individually produced events takes place at venues across L.A.,
• instigated by Anne Bray as part of Freewaves.org,
• promoted by media partner ForYourArt,
• interviewed by Sue Bell Yank  in advance of each event at KCET.org/Artbound
• and summarized by a different writer after each event there too.
• As many as of the talks as permissible will be audio recorded and posted there too.

SCHEDULE:

MAK Center, ARTISTS + INSTITUTIONS: What Is The Common Ground For Artists and Institutions?
Salon-style discussions about collectives and artists-run initiatives, graduate programs in social and public practice, and museums dedicated to novel fulfillment of educational programming.  Dialog prompts, generated by well-known artists and institutions, will be presented to the public for an evening of critical discussion and lively debate, comfortably hosted within the historic rooms and gardens of the Schindler house.
• Thursday, October 4, 7-9pm
• 835 North Kings Road, West Hollywood, CA
• organized by Kimberli Meyer (Mak Center), David Burns (Fallen Fruit) and Sara Daleiden (Los Angeles Urban Rangers);  features artists Sarah Beadle, Notch, and Christina Sanchez; Special thanks to Whole Foods Market for their generous support.

Creative Time Summit– a global annual conference exploring the intersection of art-making and social justice, streaming from NYC
• Friday, October 12, 7 am to 3:30 pm
• Watch On Livestream.com and respond on twitter #CTSummit
• Share the Summit with L.A. via streaming at Metabolic Studio, 1745 N. Spring St. #4, 90012,
coffee, bagels and comfy seats provided
• See http://creativetime.org/summit/

Occidental College:  Can the Sidewalk be a Stage?
• Thursday, October 18, 7 pm
• Dumke Commons,  Swan West 119B, 1600 Campus Dr  LA 90041
• Speakers: Lake Sharpe of Body City dance troupe, Tucker Neel, Stephen VanDyck, coordinated by artist Mary Beth Heffernan with Center with Community Based Learning and Department of Art History and Visual Arts.

EVENT: Public Matters Event: Market Makeover Smackdown
Fun, hands-on activities to help green the food desert and support sustainable change in the East L.A. food environment.
• Saturday, October 20, 10am-1pm
Ramirez Meat Market, 3618 Folsom Street at Rowan and
Yash La Casa Market, 3968 Hammel at Hazard, in East L.A.
• Participants: Mike Blockstein and Reanne Estrada, Public Matters; students from School of  Communications, New Media and Technology (CNMT) at Roosevelt High School, with UCLA-USC Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD)

Otis Graduate Public Practice at 18th Street Art Center:
What Can We Learn from dOCUMENTA (13)?
Through presentations from artists and curators who participated in or visited one of this year’s most important exhibitions in contemporary art, the evening will look at projects and reflect on the relation to social practice right now.  What can we learn from the art projects, curatorial practice, expanded notions of location, pedagogy, and their intersections?
• Wednesday, October 24, 7 pm
• 1639 18th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404
• moderated by Pilar Tompkins Rivas, Director of Residency Programs at 18th Street Arts Center
• Ciara Ennis, Director/Curator, Pitzer Art Galleries, Pitzer College
• Rita Gonzalez, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at LACMA
• Masood Kamandy, artist, participant in dOCUMENTA(13)
• Leslie Labowitz-Starus, artist
• Tamarind Rossetti,  intern with Mariam Ghani at dOCUMENTA(13) and Graduate Public Practice artist
• John Tain, art historian and curator for Modern and Contemporary Collections at the Getty Research Institute

ACLA Park, La Culebera: Can Artists Heal Nature in LA?
Artists address the question in the format of a PechaKucha and roundtable discussion
• October 25, 7 pm
• 240 S. Ave. 57, Highland Park, CA 90042
• moderated by Stephanie Pincetl, Director of the California Center for Sustainable Communities
• artists:  Hadley Arnold, Allison Behrstock, Olivia Chumacero,  Janet Owen Driggs, Ron Finley, Jenny Price, Jane Tsong, Tricia Ward, and others
• Potluck at 6.30pm. Bring food to share, or just your utensils to help make this a zero waste event.

EVENT: Tongva Talk, a Cultural Campfire,
is a time to gather around the fire and exchange knowledge and stories of indigenous history, culture and traditions, organized monthly by Olivia Chumacero. This event highlights storytelling by Tongvans.
• Friday, November 2, 7:30 pm
• Anabolic Monument, Native Plant Garden ceremonial space, at north end of the Los Angeles State Historic Park,  1245 N. Spring Los Angeles, CA 90012. Parking available on Baker Street. Bring a blanket or chair to sit on the sand.  Join in potluck dinner by bringing your own utensils.
• everythingismedicine.wordpress.com

Freewaves and UCLA IMLab at Chiparaki:
Can Artists Use Technology to Enable Communities?
Roundtable discussion, Everyone Welcome
• Saturday November 3, 1 pm
• 1637 N Spring St,  N Chinatown, 90012,  enter on Baker Street
• Fabian Wagmister (UCLA IMLab), Pedro Joel Espinosa (IDEPSCA’s Mobile Voices), Vicki Callahan (USC IML), Micha Cardenas, Shagha Ariannia  (Long Story Short), Anne Bray (Freewaves)

18th Street Art Center:  Museum Programming and their constituencies:
The case of the Queens Museum of Art and Corona Plaza
• Saturday, November 3, 5 pm
• 1639 18th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404
• Hosted and moderated by Bill Kelley Jr., 18th Street Art Center Curator in Residence
• Prerana Reddy has been the Director of Public Events for Queens Museum of Art in New York City since 2005. Reddy also spearheads the Museum’s community engagement initiatives combining arts and culture with social development goals in nearby neighborhoods predominately comprised of new immigrants, including programs that address language access, healthcare, public space advocacy, and the mortgage crisis.

LACE: Can LA Make Socially Engaged Art Happen?
Roundtable Workshop to explore the possibilities and limits of current organizational models and curatorial strategies that support Social Engagement Art practices. From trust building and community process to  funding and timing, this session invites participants to grapple with fundamental questions —  How to sustain a project?   How to represent in the community?  How  long will the work really take?
• Saturday, November 10   1 to 4pm
• 6522 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood 90028
• Kim Abeles (artist),  John Spiak (curator/director, Grand Central Art Center), Carol Stakenas (LACE) and others
• with the exhibition (Re-) Cycles of Paradise

Getty Museum: Do We Need Artists in Art Museums?
Does the role of an artist at museums stop once his or her art enters the collection and is displayed in the galleries? A growing number of museums are bringing artists into the fold – whether or not their art is displayed – and asking them to call on their own practices to devise creative opportunities for engaging diverse audiences and communities.  This panel of artists who have engaged museum audiences, and museum staff who have engaged artists, explores how museums reach communities through artists, and asks whether this is true engagement or mere flirtation.
• November 14, 7 pm
• 1200 Getty Center Dr.  Los Angeles, 90049
• Speakers TBD

Self Help Graphics + The School of Echoes:
How Can Artists and the Eastside Generate Change Together?
Is the community or the artists the protagonists? What is the role of the artist as community and vice versa? How can Artists/community drive the visioning and planning of an arts district before it happens?  How do we move beyond participants, observers, beautifiers and “decorators” and into a more integrated part of development planning?
• November 17, 4 pm
• 1300 East 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA 90033
• Evonne Gallardo (Self Help Graphics), Sandra de la Loza (artist), Alfred Fraijo Jr. (LURN: Leadership for Urban Renewal Now), Elizabeth Blaney, Leon Mostovoy, Dont Rhine, Walt Senterfitt, Leonardo Vilchis, (members of groups Ultra-red, The School of Echoes, Union de Vecinos, Woodcraft Rangers, Dept. of Public Health)

USC Roski School of Fine Art:
Occupy the Mind: Pedagogy, ‘Capitalocentrism’ and the Arts Fantasy
• November 30, Friday 3-5 pm
• 3001 S. Flower St. Los Angeles, CA 90007
• Coordinated by Kelly Akashi, Rhea Anastas, Katherine Bray, Connie Butler, Jud Fine, Jack Halberstam, A.L. Steiner, and Noura Wedell
• Participants: TBD

PAST but posted online:

USC Price School: Is LA the Creative or Anti-Creative City?
What are lines that our regulations and laws draw around the arts, exploring the edges between art and the city? Do artists represent only gentrification for our communities? How does art, and how do artists add value to urban life? How should planners consider art and artists? How do planning regulations aid the creation of a creatively vibrant city that adds not only economic value but also cultural excitement to the lives of urban residents?
• Urban Growth Seminar on Tuesday, September 18, 12 noon to 1:30 pm
• At USC Lewis Hall 101
• Elizabeth Currid (USC Price) and Sarah Schrank (History, CSULB), moderated by David Sloane (USC Price)
• posted at USC Youtube channel of the Urban Growth Seminar
• audio posted at KCET.org/Artboundcolumn of Sue Bell YankMORE DETAILS:

http://freewaves.org/public-art-social-practice/a-series-of-discussions-about-socially-engaged-art-in-l-a-fall-2012/


Open Engagement, AAM, Social Practice and a Forward Vision @ Grand Central Art Center

May 24, 2012

Social Practice is a major focus of our Forward Vision at Grand Central Art Center (GCAC), so we were honored by an invitation to participate in the Open Engagement conference in Portland, Oregon (May 18-20).  GCAC was represented on two panels by Director/Chief Curator John D. Spiak, which included:

René de Guzman, Dominic Willsdon, John D. Spiak, Stephanie Parrish, Allison Agsten

It Turns Out There Is Room For Everyone: Museums and Social Practice – with panelists Dominic Willsdon (SFMOMA), Allison Agsten (Hammer Museum), René de Guzman (Oakland Museum of California), Stephanie Parrish (Portland Art Museum) and John D. Spiak (Grand Central Art Center). Moderated by Harrell Fletcher (Portland State University).

and

Gregory Sale, John D. Spiak, Pete Brook, Julie Perini

Prison Communities: You Can’t Arrest Your Way to a Solution. Social Practice Engaging the Criminal Justice System – with panelists Gregory Sale, John D. Spiak, Pete Brook, Rachel Marie-Crane Williams and Julie Perini.

Bernie Díaz (Faculty @ SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts), Ariel Gentalen, Karla Monterrey, Shannon Jackson (Director of ARC @ UC Berkeley), Carlin Boyle

We were able to encourage, with the help of GCAC Artist in Residence Jules Rochielle, a few California State University Fullerton students, a faculty and staff member to attend the conference.  Those in attendance included: CSUF students Carlin Boyle, Ariel Gentalen, Karla Monterrey; CSUF faculty member Gretchen Potts; and CSUF staff member Mylan Chacon.  The conference allowed the opportunity for these individuals to connect with national figures of the art world, including artists, theorists, educators and curators.  It was clear that these individuals were truly inspired by the experience.  We are sure this will have a major impact on GCAC and the CSUF College of Art, especially starting next semester, as these individuals are playing key roles on the campus community – Karla leading CSUF Arts Week this coming year; Ariel leading the CSUF Arts Inter-Club Council; and Carlin through her Evoke Unity efforts.

Three weeks ago, Spiak also represented GCAC through two panels at the American Association of Museums Annual Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which included:

Getting into the Bones: Museums, Dance and Social Action – with panelists Gregory Sale (Arizona State University), Robin Conrad (Fullerton College), Elizabeth Johnson (Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts) and John D. Spiak (Grand Central Art Center)

and

Kris Morrissey, Robert Garfinkle, John D. Spiak, Emily F. Zimmern, Thomas M. Finkelpearl

New Roles/New Culture: Tackling Tough Topics and Engaging New Audiences – with panelists Thomas M. Finkelpearl (Queens Museum of Art), Emily F. Zimmern (Levine Museum of the New South), Robert Garfinkle (Science Museum of Minnesota) and John D. Spiak (Grand Central Art Center).  Moderated by Kris Morrissey (Director, Museology Program, University of Washington).

The inspiration and knowledge these conferences provided inform this institution as our Forward Vision document develops and becomes more refined.

The in-progress Forward Vision for Grand Central Art Center focuses on the belief that the key to success in Social Practice Residencies is complete honesty, trust and openness by the institution, curator and artist with all potential collaborators and participants. GCAC is open to exploring, through artistic practice and conversation, the complexities of society – acknowledging that we may raise more questions than perhaps answer.  This institution is open to flexibility and adjustment throughout a project/residency as envisioned by the artist, leaving the opportunity for new discoveries to develop – creating the possibilities for even greater, successful and mutually beneficial outcomes for artist, institution and collaborator.  We use the term “successful” loosely, as we acknowledge that failure of a process also brings knowledge.  These rules should apply to any institution exhibition, program or project, but they are even more essential when working with community and artists through Social Practice residence.  Without an honest approach, trust cannot be secured to build connections with diverse individuals through an artist’s vision.

Shannon Jackson (Open Engagement Keynote)

We also acknowledge the kinds of results that often occur at the conclusion of a residency or Social Practice based project are not always easily measured, in the traditional sense.  For example, attendance figures, tour numbers and budgets may not be the most appropriate measures of “success.”  Unfortunately, these are the most common types of statistics that funders and agencies require in grant reports, usually due immediately upon completion of the project.

GCAC understands that many projects in Social Practice should not, and can not, be limited by a set timeline for completion.  Therefore, it is our goal to provide an artist time needed to realize their vision.  Often the first question asked by individuals when inquiring of our Artist in Residence program is “how long is each residency?”  To this we will answer, “we do not know,” as each will be determined by the artist, their project and their collaborators working through GCAC.  We also understand that even though a project might be considered complete, impact of that project, and even the project itself, may continue beyond the artist and institution.

If It Doesn’t It Should (Open Engagement Panel) – Ted Purves, Harrell Fletcher, Cassandra Thornton

GCAC will look at traditional and standard matrix measurements for each project, but we will also measure, validate and share the success, and/or failure, of each Social Practice Residency through the following:  gathering of personal stories and testimonials (artist, institution, organizations, community); presenting at national conferences (American Association of Museums, College Art Association, Open Engagement); creating web and print based documentation (website, blog, catalogues); writing and publishing articles in national journals (Museum and Social Issues, Art Education, Journal of Art for Life); and direct sharing with colleagues of peer institutions and through society itself.

The Social Practice Artist in Residence is just one component of our institution, but the philosophies of this program will guide GCAC in the further development of Forward Vision documents for our exhibitions, education, public programs and outreach.  Their outcomes will be measured in the same fashion and be accountable to our mission as a contemporary art center.  We will raise questions, allow inquire, be open to opposing view points, be challenged and/or criticized, in the hope of understanding greater society, the role of contemporary art and our shared, or unshared, experiences.  It is important for us as a contemporary art center to acknowledge that we may not be able to change lives or minds, but it is our hope to change moments.